Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

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    Biodiversity recovery of Neotropical secondary forests
    Rozendaal, Danaë M.A. ; Bongers, Frans ; Aide, T.M. ; Alvarez-Dávila, Esteban ; Ascarrunz, Nataly ; Balvanera, Patricia ; Becknell, Justin M. ; Bentos, Tony V. ; Brancalion, Pedro H.S. ; Cabral, George A.L. ; Calvo-Rodriguez, Sofia ; Chave, Jerome ; César, Ricardo G. ; Chazdon, Robin L. ; Condit, Richard ; Dallinga, Jorn S. ; Almeida-Cortez, Jarcilene S. De; Jong, Ben de; Oliveira, Alexandre De; Denslow, Julie S. ; Dent, Daisy H. ; Dewalt, Saara J. ; Dupuy, Juan Manuel ; Durán, Sandra M. ; Dutrieux, Loïc P. ; Espírito-Santo, Mario M. ; Fandino, María C. ; Fernandes, G.W. ; Finegan, Bryan ; García, Hernando ; Gonzalez, Noel ; Moser, Vanessa Granda ; Hall, Jefferson S. ; Hernández-Stefanoni, José Luis ; Hubbell, Stephen ; Jakovac, Catarina C. ; Hernández, Alma Johanna ; Junqueira, André B. ; Kennard, Deborah ; Larpin, Denis ; Letcher, Susan G. ; Licona, Juan-Carlos ; Lebrija-trejos, Edwin ; Marín-Spiotta, Erika ; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel ; Massoca, Paulo E.S. ; Meave, Jorge A. ; Mesquita, Rita C.G. ; Mora, Francisco ; Müller, Sandra C. ; Muñoz, Rodrigo ; Oliveira Neto, Silvio Nolasco De; Norden, Natalia ; Nunes, Yule R.F. ; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana ; Ortiz-Malavassi, Edgar ; Ostertag, Rebecca ; Peña-Caros, Marielos ; Pérez-García, Eduardo A. ; Piotto, Daniel ; Powers, Jennifer S. ; Aguilar-Cano, José ; Rodriguez-Buritica, Susana ; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Jorge ; Romero-Romero, Marco Antonio ; Ruíz, Jorge ; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo ; Almeida, Arlete Silva De; Silver, Whendee L. ; Schwartz, Naomi B. ; Thomas, William Wayt ; Toledo, Marisol ; Uriarte, Maria ; Sá Sampaio, Everardo Valadares De; Breugel, Michiel van; Wal, Hans van der; Martins, Sebastião Venâncio ; Veloso, Maria D.M. ; Vester, Hans F.M. ; Vicentini, Alberto ; Vieira, Ima C.G. ; Villa, Pedro ; Williamson, G.B. ; Zanini, Kátia J. ; Zimmerman, Jess ; Poorter, Lourens - \ 2019
    Science Advances 5 (2019)3. - ISSN 2375-2548 - 10 p.
    Old-growth tropical forests harbor an immense diversity of tree species but are rapidly being cleared, while secondary forests that regrow on abandoned agricultural lands increase in extent. We assess how tree species richness and composition recover during secondary succession across gradients in environmental conditions and anthropogenic disturbance in an unprecedented multisite analysis for the Neotropics. Secondary forests recover remarkably fast in species richness but slowly in species composition. Secondary forests take a median time of five decades to recover the species richness of old-growth forest (80% recovery after 20 years) based on rarefaction analysis. Full recovery of species composition takes centuries (only 34% recovery after 20 years). A dual strategy that maintains both old-growth forests and species-rich secondary forests is therefore crucial for biodiversity conservation in human-modified tropical landscapes.
    Legume abundance along successional and rainfall gradients in Neotropical forests
    Gei, Maga ; Rozendaal, Danaë M.A. ; Poorter, Lourens ; Bongers, Frans ; Sprent, Janet I. ; Garner, Mira D. ; Aide, T.M. ; Andrade, José Luis ; Balvanera, Patricia ; Becknell, Justin M. ; Brancalion, Pedro H.S. ; Cabral, George A.L. ; César, Ricardo Gomes ; Chazdon, Robin L. ; Cole, Rebecca J. ; Colletta, Gabriel Dalla ; Jong, Ben De; Denslow, Julie S. ; Dent, Daisy H. ; Dewalt, Saara J. ; Dupuy, Juan Manuel ; Durán, Sandra M. ; Espírito Santo, Mário Marcos Do; Fernandes, G.W. ; Nunes, Yule Roberta Ferreira ; Finegan, Bryan ; Moser, Vanessa Granda ; Hall, Jefferson S. ; Hernández-Stefanoni, José Luis ; Junqueira, André B. ; Kennard, Deborah ; Lebrija-Trejos, Edwin ; Letcher, Susan G. ; Lohbeck, Madelon ; Marín-Spiotta, Erika ; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel ; Meave, Jorge A. ; Menge, Duncan N.L. ; Mora, Francisco ; Muñoz, Rodrigo ; Muscarella, Robert ; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana ; Orihuela-Belmonte, Edith ; Ostertag, Rebecca ; Peña-Claros, Marielos ; Pérez-García, Eduardo A. ; Piotto, Daniel ; Reich, Peter B. ; Reyes-García, Casandra ; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Jorge ; Romero-Pérez, I.E. ; Sanaphre-Villanueva, Lucía ; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo ; Schwartz, Naomi B. ; Almeida, Arlete Silva De; Almeida-Cortez, Jarcilene S. ; Silver, Whendee ; Souza Moreno, Vanessa De; Sullivan, Benjamin W. ; Swenson, Nathan G. ; Uriarte, Maria ; Breugel, Michiel Van; Wal, Hans Van Der; Veloso, Maria Das Dores Magalhães ; Vester, Hans F.M. ; Vieira, Ima Célia Guimarães ; Zimmerman, Jess K. ; Powers, Jennifer S. - \ 2018
    Nature Ecology & Evolution 2 (2018)7. - ISSN 2397-334X - p. 1104 - 1111.
    The nutrient demands of regrowing tropical forests are partly satisfied by nitrogen-fixing legume trees, but our understanding of the abundance of those species is biased towards wet tropical regions. Here we show how the abundance of Leguminosae is affected by both recovery from disturbance and large-scale rainfall gradients through a synthesis of forest inventory plots from a network of 42 Neotropical forest chronosequences. During the first three decades of natural forest regeneration, legume basal area is twice as high in dry compared with wet secondary forests. The tremendous ecological success of legumes in recently disturbed, water-limited forests is likely to be related to both their reduced leaflet size and ability to fix N2, which together enhance legume drought tolerance and water-use efficiency. Earth system models should incorporate these large-scale successional and climatic patterns of legume dominance to provide more accurate estimates of the maximum potential for natural nitrogen fixation across tropical forests.
    Demographic Drivers of Aboveground Biomass Dynamics During Secondary Succession in Neotropical Dry and Wet Forests
    Rozendaal, Danaë M.A. ; Chazdon, Robin L. ; Arreola-Villa, Felipe ; Balvanera, Patricia ; Bentos, Tony V. ; Dupuy, Juan M. ; Hernández-Stefanoni, J.L. ; Jakovac, Catarina C. ; Lebrija-Trejos, Edwin E. ; Lohbeck, Madelon ; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel ; Massoca, Paulo E.S. ; Meave, Jorge A. ; Mesquita, Rita C.G. ; Mora, Francisco ; Pérez-García, Eduardo A. ; Romero-Pérez, I.E. ; Saenz-Pedroza, Irving ; Breugel, Michiel van; Williamson, G.B. ; Bongers, Frans - \ 2017
    Ecosystems 20 (2017)2. - ISSN 1432-9840 - p. 340 - 353.
    Biomass accumulation - carbon sink - forest dynamics - Neotropics - second-growth tropical forest - species’ dominance - tree demography

    The magnitude of the carbon sink in second-growth forests is expected to vary with successional biomass dynamics resulting from tree growth, recruitment, and mortality, and with the effects of climate on these dynamics. We compare aboveground biomass dynamics of dry and wet Neotropical forests, based on monitoring data gathered over 3–16 years in forests covering the first 25 years of succession. We estimated standing biomass, annual biomass change, and contributions of tree growth, recruitment, and mortality. We also evaluated tree species’ contributions to biomass dynamics. Absolute rates of biomass change were lower in dry forests, 2.3 and 1.9 Mg ha−1 y−1, after 5–15 and 15–25 years after abandonment, respectively, than in wet forests, with 4.7 and 6.1 Mg ha−1 y−1, in the same age classes. Biomass change was largely driven by tree growth, accounting for at least 48% of biomass change across forest types and age classes. Mortality also contributed strongly to biomass change in wet forests of 5–15 years, whereas its contribution became important later in succession in dry forests. Biomass dynamics tended to be dominated by fewer species in early-successional dry than wet forests, but dominance was strong in both forest types. Overall, our results indicate that biomass dynamics during succession are faster in Neotropical wet than dry forests, with high tree mortality earlier in succession in the wet forests. Long-term monitoring of second-growth tropical forest plots is crucial for improving estimates of annual biomass change, and for enhancing understanding of the underlying mechanisms and demographic drivers.

    Data from: Environmental gradients and the evolution of successional habitat specialization: a test case with 14 Neotropical forest sites
    Letcher, Susan G. ; Lasky, Jesse R. ; Chazdon, Robin L. ; Norden, Natalia ; Wright, S.J. ; Meave, Jorge A. ; Pérez-García, Eduardo A. ; Muñoz, Rodrigo ; Romero-Pérez, Eunice ; Andrade, Ana ; Balvanera, Patricia ; Bongers, Frans ; Lohbeck, Madelon - \ 2016
    State University of New York (SUNY)
    Determinants of plant community diversity and structure - Life History Evolution - Precipitation gradient - Tropical wet forest - Tropical dry forest - Functional traits - phylogeny - Pioneer species
    1. Successional gradients are ubiquitous in nature, yet few studies have systematically examined the evolutionary origins of taxa that specialize at different successional stages. Here we quantify successional habitat specialization in Neotropical forest trees and evaluate its evolutionary lability along a precipitation gradient. Theoretically, successional habitat specialization should be more evolutionarily conserved in wet forests than in dry forests due to more extreme microenvironmental differentiation between early and late successional stages in wet forest. 2. We applied a robust multinomial classification model to samples of primary and secondary forest trees from 14 Neotropical lowland forest sites spanning a precipitation gradient from 788 to 4000 mm annual rainfall, identifying species that are old growth specialists and secondary forest specialists in each site. We constructed phylogenies for the classified taxa at each site and for the entire set of classified taxa, and tested whether successional habitat specialization is phylogenetically conserved. We further investigated differences in the functional traits of species specializing in secondary vs. old-growth forest along the precipitation gradient, expecting different trait associations with secondary forest specialists in wet vs. dry forests since water availability is more limiting in dry forests and light availability more limiting in wet forests. 3. Successional habitat specialization is non-randomly distributed in the angiosperm phylogeny, with a tendency towards phylogenetic conservatism overall and a trend toward stronger conservatism in wet forests than in dry forests. However, the specialists come from all the major branches of the angiosperm phylogeny, and very few functional traits showed any consistent relationships with successional habitat specialization in either wet or dry forests. 4. Synthesis: The niche conservatism evident in the habitat specialization of Neotropical trees suggests a role for radiation into different successional habitats in the evolution of species-rich genera, though the diversity of functional traits that lead to success in different successional habitats complicates analyses at the community scale. Examining the distribution of particular lineages with respect to successional gradients may provide more insight into the role of successional habitat specialization in the evolution of species-rich taxa.
    Environmental gradients and the evolution of successional habitat specialization : A test case with 14 Neotropical forest sites
    Letcher, Susan G. ; Lasky, Jesse R. ; Chazdon, Robin L. ; Norden, Natalia ; Wright, S.J. ; Meave, Jorge A. ; Pérez-García, Eduardo A. ; Muñoz, Rodrigo ; Romero-Pérez, Eunice ; Andrade, Ana ; Balvanera, Patricia ; Bongers, Frans ; Lohbeck, Madelon - \ 2015
    Journal of Ecology 103 (2015)5. - ISSN 0022-0477 - p. 1276 - 1290.
    Determinants of plant community diversity and structure - Functional traits - Life-history evolution - Phylogeny - Pioneer species - Precipitation gradient - Tropical dry forest - Tropical wet forest

    Successional gradients are ubiquitous in nature, yet few studies have systematically examined the evolutionary origins of taxa that specialize at different successional stages. Here we quantify successional habitat specialization in Neotropical forest trees and evaluate its evolutionary lability along a precipitation gradient. Theoretically, successional habitat specialization should be more evolutionarily conserved in wet forests than in dry forests due to more extreme microenvironmental differentiation between early and late-successional stages in wet forest. We applied a robust multinomial classification model to samples of primary and secondary forest trees from 14 Neotropical lowland forest sites spanning a precipitation gradient from 788 to 4000 mm annual rainfall, identifying species that are old-growth specialists and secondary forest specialists in each site. We constructed phylogenies for the classified taxa at each site and for the entire set of classified taxa and tested whether successional habitat specialization is phylogenetically conserved. We further investigated differences in the functional traits of species specializing in secondary vs. old-growth forest along the precipitation gradient, expecting different trait associations with secondary forest specialists in wet vs. dry forests since water availability is more limiting in dry forests and light availability more limiting in wet forests. Successional habitat specialization is non-randomly distributed in the angiosperm phylogeny, with a tendency towards phylogenetic conservatism overall and a trend towards stronger conservatism in wet forests than in dry forests. However, the specialists come from all the major branches of the angiosperm phylogeny, and very few functional traits showed any consistent relationships with successional habitat specialization in either wet or dry forests. Synthesis. The niche conservatism evident in the habitat specialization of Neotropical trees suggests a role for radiation into different successional habitats in the evolution of species-rich genera, though the diversity of functional traits that lead to success in different successional habitats complicates analyses at the community scale. Examining the distribution of particular lineages with respect to successional gradients may provide more insight into the role of successional habitat specialization in the evolution of species-rich taxa.

    Successional changes in functional composition contrast for dry and wet tropical forest
    Lohbeck, M.W.M. ; Poorter, L. ; Lebrija-Trejos, E.E. ; Martinez-Ramos, M. ; Meave, J.A. ; Paz, H. ; Perez-Garcia, E.A. ; Romero-Perez, I.E. ; Tauro, A. ; Bongers, F. - \ 2013
    Ecology 94 (2013)6. - ISSN 0012-9658 - p. 1211 - 1216.
    leaf life-span - secondary succession - seed size - neotropical forests - economics spectrum - woody-plants - traits - mortality - diversity - worldwide
    We tested whether and how functional composition changes with succession in dry deciduous and wet evergreen forests of Mexico. We hypothesized that compositional changes during succession in dry forest were mainly determined by increasing water availability leading to community functional changes from conservative to acquisitive strategies, and in wet forest by decreasing light availability leading to changes from acquisitive to conservative strategies. Research was carried out in 15 dry secondary forest plots (5–63 years after abandonment) and 17 wet secondary forest plots (
    Predicting Tropical Dry Forest Successional Attributes from Space: Is the Key Hidden in Image Texture?
    Gallardo-Cruz, J.A. ; Meave, J.A. ; Gonzalez, E.J. ; Lebrija Trejos, E.E. ; Romero-Romero, M.A. ; Perez-Garcia, E.A. ; Gallardo-Cruz, R. ; Hernandez-Stefanoni, J.L. ; Martorell, C. - \ 2012
    PLoS ONE 7 (2012)2. - ISSN 1932-6203
    greenhouse-gas emissions - thematic mapper imagery - remotely-sensed data - landsat tm data - secondary forest - biomass estimation - cross-validation - climate-change - rain-forest - countryside biogeography
    Biodiversity conservation and ecosystem-service provision will increasingly depend on the existence of secondary vegetation. Our success in achieving these goals will be determined by our ability to accurately estimate the structure and diversity of such communities at broad geographic scales. We examined whether the texture (the spatial variation of the image elements) of very high-resolution satellite imagery can be used for this purpose. In 14 fallows of different ages and one mature forest stand in a seasonally dry tropical forest landscape, we estimated basal area, canopy cover, stem density, species richness, Shannon index, Simpson index, and canopy height. The first six attributes were also estimated for a subset comprising the tallest plants. We calculated 40 texture variables based on the red and the near infrared bands, and EVI and NDVI, and selected the best-fit linear models describing each vegetation attribute based on them. Basal area (R-2 = 0.93), vegetation height and cover (0.89), species richness (0.87), and stand age (0.85) were the best-described attributes by two-variable models. Cross validation showed that these models had a high predictive power, and most estimated vegetation attributes were highly accurate. The success of this simple method (a single image was used and the models were linear and included very few variables) rests on the principle that image texture reflects the internal heterogeneity of successional vegetation at the proper scale. The vegetation attributes best predicted by texture are relevant in the face of two of the gravest threats to biosphere integrity: climate change and biodiversity loss. By providing reliable basal area and fallow-age estimates, image-texture analysis allows for the assessment of carbon sequestration and diversity loss rates. New and exciting research avenues open by simplifying the analysis of the extent and complexity of successional vegetation through the spatial variation of its spectral information.
    Appraisal of the Epidemiology of Neospora caninum Infection in Costa Rican Dairy Cattle
    Romero Zúñiga, J.J. - \ 2005
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Mart de Jong, co-promotor(en): Klaas Frankena; E. Pérez Gutiérrez. - [S.l.] : S.n. - ISBN 9789085042709 - 137
    melkkoeien - melkveestapel - neospora caninum - neosporose - melkresultaten - voortplanting - abortus - vaccins - epidemiologie - costa rica - dairy cows - dairy herds - neospora caninum - neosporosis - dairy performance - reproduction - abortion - vaccines - epidemiology - costa rica
    Costa Rica, milk production has increased gradually during the twentieth century, in which the activity developed from a non-technical to a technical activity. Together with the evolution of the dairy sector, the incidence of infectious and metabolic diseases increased, leading to increased economic losses. According to a VAMPP data base, the global percentage of abortion during the period between 1988 and 2003 varied between 7.5 and 12%; but at individual farms abortion rates close to 30% occurred in one or more years. Abortion is one of the most important economic disorders.Since the 90´sneosporosis( N.caninum ) has been associated with abortion andfoetallosses in cattle all over the world.In 1996, a study stated (for the first time) the presence ofneosporosisinCosta Ricaand N.caninum was diagnosed (Perez et al., 1998).The aim of this thesis is to describe the most important features ofneosporosisin Costa Rican dairy cattle in order to develop strategies for the prevention and control of the infection. The main results of this thesis are: 1)no significant effects ofNeosporaserostatuswere detected on (re)productive performance; 2) theassociation between management and environmental factors withserostatuswas found to be absent3) in the specific conditions of the dairy herds involved in this study, theserostatusof the cows should be not used as predictor of theserostatusof daughters due to the high probability of horizontal transmission, 4) the killed wholeNeosporacaninumtachyzoitepreparation reduced the abortion rate in Costa Rican dairy cattle.
    Intervet Symposium: bovine neosporosis
    Schetters, T. ; Dubey, J.P. ; Adrianarivo, A. ; Frankena, K. ; Romero, J.J. ; Pérez, E. ; Heuer, C. ; Nicholson, C. ; Russell, D. ; Weston, J. - \ 2004
    Veterinary Parasitology 125 (2004)1-2. - ISSN 0304-4017 - p. 137 - 146.
    caninum-associated abortion - dairy-cattle - vertical transmission - immune-responses - infection - herds - dogs - cows - protection - california
    This article summarises the most relevant data of presentations delivered at the 19th International Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) held in New Orleans, LA, USA, from 10 to 14 August 2003) in a symposium session on bovine neosporosis. The symposium was organised by Juan Munoz-Bielsa, Wicher Holland, Enzo Foccoli and Theo Schetters (chairman). The focus was on the present state of knowledge of the biology, epidemiology (presented by J.P. Dubey) and immunology of Neospora infection (presented by A. Adrianarivo), with special emphasis on the prospects of vaccination of cattle against Neospora-induced abortion (presentations of K. Frankena (Costa Rican trial) and C. Heuer (New Zealand trial)).
    Effect of a killed whole Neospora caninum tachyzoite vaccine on the crube abortion rate of Costa Rican dairy cows under field conditions
    Romero, J.J. ; Perez, E. ; Frankena, K. - \ 2004
    Veterinary Parasitology 123 (2004)3-4. - ISSN 0304-4017 - p. 149 - 159.
    vertical transmission - postnatal transmission - toxoplasma-gondii - immune-responses - pregnant cattle - balb/c mice - infection - herd - virus - dogs
    A standard field trial was carried out to assess the effect of a commercial Neospora-vaccine based on whole killed tachyzoites (Bovilis–Neoguard, Intervet®) on the abortion rate. Eight hundred and seventy-six cows, over 2.5 months pregnant, belonging to 25 Costa Rican dairy herds, were used in the analysis. For each cow vaccinated, a cow of the same herd, breed and age category, was selected as control. The period of administration of treatments extended from June to November of 2000. The treatments were administered in two, 5 ml doses 1 month apart, the first dose given between day 75 and 90 of gestation. The incidence of abortion among all treated cows was of 16.0% (140/876). The treatment specific incidence was 11.2% (49/438) and 20.8% (91/438) for the vaccinated and the placebo group, respectively. The prevented fraction by vaccination amounted to 0.46 (95% CI: 0.26, 0.61), and the cumulative incidence ratio for the vaccinated group was 0.54. The Cox hazard ratio was 0.51(95% CI: 0.37, 0.72), meaning that the force of abortion is reduced twice in the vaccinated group. The results of this study, the first one following this type of design, shows that the killed whole Neospora caninum tachyzoite preparation had a reasonable effect on the abortion rate in Costa Rican dairy cattle.
    Factors associated with Neospora caninum serostatus in cattle of 20 specialised Costa Rican dairy herds
    Romero, J.J. ; Perez, E. ; Dolz, G. ; Frankena, K. - \ 2002
    Preventive Veterinary Medicine 53 (2002). - ISSN 0167-5877 - p. 263 - 273.
    Twenty-five specialised Costa Rican dairy farms (located in the Poás area) were used to determine neosporosis seroprevalence and the association of seropositivity with environmental and management factors. The farms involved were selected intentionally and all of them use VAMPP 5.1 (Veterinary Automated Management and Production Control Programme) as management-information system. Holstein–Friesian, Jersey and crosses between them were the most-frequent breeds in these herds. The number of females per farm varied from 41 to 296. Our cross-sectional study had two phases. In the first phase, we determined the presence or absence of seropositivity at herd level. For the second phase, all females in 20 seropositive farms were bled. Serum samples were tested for antibodies to Neospora caninum using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A questionnaire with factors mentioned in the literature was administered to the farmers. Logistic regression (LR with herd as random effect) was used to assess the relationships of the serostatus at the individual level with characteristics of the cows and environmental factors. In the first phase all herds had >20 eropositive females; therefore, all herds were eligible for the second phase. In the second phase, the overall prevalence was 39.7ø1191/3002), and within-herd prevalences were between 25.0 and 70.5&Eth;Age 3–6 years, parity 2 of the dam of the cow, Jersey breed and lack of purposive sampling to diagnose abortive infectious disease were associated with positive serostatus; other management and environmental factors did not show significant associations. The lack of association between management and environmental factors with serostatus might be because all farms were exposed to a considerable number of potential factors. That all herds of this study were seropositive for neosporosis and the within-herd prevalence was considerable raises questions about how far the infection is spread in other dairy areas of Costa Rica
    Heterogeneidad, cultura, impacto, acción individual y colectiva : por un nuevo enfoque en el estudio de las organizaciones económicas campesinas bolivianes
    Laguna, P. - \ 1999
    In: Sociólogos en el umbral del Siglo XXI : II Congreso Nacional de Sociologia, La Paz, 1999 / G. Danilo Paz, R. Sandoval, S. León, P. Romero, M.I. Pérez (eds). - [S.l.] : Colegio de Sociólogos de Bolivia, 1999. - ISBN 84-89891-53-2 - p. 211 - 233.
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