Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

    Records 1 - 5 / 5

    • help
    • print

      Print search results

    • export

      Export search results

    Check title to add to marked list
    Enhanced nutrient supply and intestinal microbiota development in very low birth weight infants
    Blakstad, Elin W. ; Korpela, Katri ; Lee, Sindre ; Nakstad, Britt ; Moltu, Sissel J. ; Strømmen, Kenneth ; Rønnestad, Arild E. ; Brække, Kristin ; Iversen, Per O. ; Vos, Willem M. de; Drevon, Christian A. - \ 2019
    Pediatric Research 86 (2019). - ISSN 0031-3998 - p. 323 - 332.

    Background: Promoting a healthy intestinal microbiota may have positive effects on short- and long-term outcomes in very low birth weight (VLBW; BW < 1500 g) infants. Nutrient supply influences the intestinal microbiota. Methods: Fifty VLBW infants were randomized to an intervention group receiving enhanced nutrient supply or a control group. Fecal samples from 45 infants collected between birth and discharge were analyzed using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) amplicon sequencing. Results: There was considerable individual variation in microbiota development. Microbial richness decreased towards discharge in the controls compared to the intervention group. In the intervention group, there was a greater increase in diversity among moderately/very preterm (MVP, gestational age ≥ 28 weeks) infants and a steeper decrease in relative Staphylococcus abundance in extremely preterm (EP, gestational age < 28 weeks) infants as compared to controls. Relative Bifidobacterium abundance tended to increase more in MVP controls compared to the intervention group. Abundance of pathogens was not increased in the intervention group. Higher relative Bifidobacterium abundance was associated with improved weight gain. Conclusion: Nutrition may affect richness, diversity, and microbiota composition. There was no increase in relative abundance of pathogens among infants receiving enhanced nutrient supply. Favorable microbiota development was associated with improved weight gain.

    Microbiota development in preterm and term infants
    Korpela, Katri ; Blakstad, Elin W. ; Moltu, Sissel J. ; Strømmen, Kenneth ; Nakstad, Britt ; Rønnestad, Arild E. ; Brække, Kristin ; Iversen, Per O. ; Drevon, Christian A. ; Vos, W.M. de - \ 2018
    Wageningen University
    PRJEB26802 - PRJEB26802 - ERP108820
    Microbiota development in (pre)term infants receiving various durations of postpartum antibiotic treatment. Determined through 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing (MiSeq, Illumina)
    Intestinal microbiota development and gestational age in preterm neonates
    Korpela, Katri ; Blakstad, Elin W. ; Moltu, Sissel J. ; Strømmen, Kenneth ; Nakstad, Britt ; Rønnestad, Arild E. ; Brække, Kristin ; Iversen, Per O. ; Drevon, Christian A. ; Vos, Willem de - \ 2018
    Scientific Reports 8 (2018)1. - ISSN 2045-2322 - 9 p.

    The intestinal microbiota is an important contributor to the health of preterm infants, and may be destabilized by a number of environmental factors and treatment modalities. How to promote the development of a healthy microbiota in preterm infants is largely unknown. We collected fecal samples from 45 breastfed preterm very low birth weight (birth weight < 1500 g) infants from birth until 60 days postnatal age to characterize the intestinal microbiota development during the first weeks of life in preterm infants. Fecal microbiota composition was determined by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. The main driver of microbiota development was gestational age; antibiotic use had strong but temporary effects and birth mode had little influence. Microbiota development proceeded in four phases indicated by the dominance of Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Enterobacter, and finally Bifidobacterium. The Enterococcus phase was only observed among the extremely premature infants and appeared to delay the microbiota succession. The results indicate that hospitalized preterm infants receiving breast milk may develop a normal microbiota resembling that of term infants.

    A first attempt to estimate protein turnover using a simulation model for amino acid metabolism in yolk-sac larvae of Clarias gariepinus (Burchell) and Hippoglossus hippoglossus (L.).
    Conceiçâo, L. ; Polat, A. ; Ronnestad, I. ; Machiels, M. ; Verreth, J.A.J. - \ 1995
    ICES Marine Science Symposia 201 (1995). - p. 80 - 84.
    A dynamic simulation model for amino acid metabolism in yolk-sac larvae of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus (Burchell).
    Conceiçao, L. ; Verreth, J. ; Polat, A. ; Ronnestad, I. ; Machiels, M. - \ 1993
    Aquaculture and fisheries management 24 (1993). - ISSN 0266-996X - p. 431 - 445.
    Check title to add to marked list

    Show 20 50 100 records per page

     
    Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.