Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Response of sediment bacterial community to triclosan in subtropical freshwater benthic microcosms
Peng, Feng Jiao ; Diepens, Noël J. ; Pan, Chang Gui ; Ying, Guang Guo ; Salvito, Daniel ; Selck, Henriette ; Brink, Paul J. Van den - \ 2019
Environmental Pollution 248 (2019). - ISSN 0269-7491 - p. 676 - 683.
Benthic macroinvertebrates - Microcosm - Sediment bacterial community - Toxicity - Triclosan

The response of sediment bacterial communities in subtropical freshwater benthic microcosms to sediment-associated triclosan (TCS; 28 d exposure) was analysed using Illumina high-throughput sequencing. This study highlights the interactive effects of TCS and the presence of benthic macroinvertebrates (Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri and Viviparidae bellamya) on sediment bacterial communities. Our results show that TCS alone significantly altered the taxonomic composition and decreased alpha diversity of sediment bacterial communities at concentrations ≥80 μg TCS/g dry weight (dw) sediment (sed). Regarding dominant phyla, TCS significantly reduced the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes at these concentrations, whereas the relative abundance of Chloroflexi and Cyanobacteria increased. In the presence of benthic macroinvertebrates, the sediment bacterial community was affected by 8 μg TCS/g dw sed as well. However, the presence of benthic macroinvertebrates did not cause measurable changes to bacterial community in unspiked (i.e., control) sediment. These results indicate that TCS alone would not alter the sediment bacterial community at environmentally relevant concentrations (up till 8 μg/g dw sed), but may have an effect in combination with the presence of benthic macroinvertebrates. Therefore, we recommend to include benthic macroinvertebrates when assessing the response of sediment bacterial communities during exposure to environmental stress such as organic contaminants.

Fate and effects of sediment-associated polycyclic musk HHCB in subtropical freshwater microcosms
Peng, Feng Jiao ; Kiggen, Fionne ; Pan, Chang Gui ; Bracewell, Sally A. ; Ying, Guang Guo ; Salvito, Daniel ; Selck, Henriette ; Brink, Paul J. Van den - \ 2019
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 169 (2019). - ISSN 0147-6513 - p. 902 - 910.
Bacterial community - Benthic macroinvertebrates - Bioaccumulation - Dissipation - HHCB - Toxicity

Galaxolide (HHCB) is used as a fragrance ingredient in household and personal care products, and has been ubiquitously detected in the environment. Here we investigated the fate of HHCB in subtropical freshwater microcosms, and evaluated effects of sediment-associated HHCB on a biological community consisting of algae, Daphnia, benthic macroinvertebrates and bacteria. The concentrations of sediment-associated HHCB did not change significantly during a 28 days exposure period, but HHCB accumulated in worms with biota-sediment accumulation-factor (BSAF) values in the range of 0.29–0.66 for Branchiura sowerbyi and 0.94–2.11 for Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri. There was no significant effects of HHCB (30 μg/g dry weight (dw) sediment) on chlorophyll-a content, sediment bacterial community composition, and survival and growth of benthic macroinvertebrates. However, the presence of benthic macroinvertebrates altered the sediment bacterial community structure relative to microcosms without introduced organisms. The findings of this study suggest that a single high-dose of HHCB, over 28 days, at environmentally relevant concentrations would not impose direct toxicological risks to aquatic organisms such as benthic macroinvertebrates.

Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Triclosan and Galaxolide in the Freshwater Oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri in a Water/Sediment Microcosm
Peng, Feng-Jiao ; Ying, Guang Guo ; Pan, Chang Gui ; Selck, Henriette ; Salvito, Daniel ; Brink, Paul J. van den - \ 2018
Environmental Science and Technology 52 (2018)15. - ISSN 0013-936X - p. 8390 - 8398.

Personal care products are widely used in our daily life in considerable quantities and discharged via the down-the-drain route to aquatic environments, resulting in potential risks to aquatic organisms. We investigated bioaccumulation and biotransformation of two widely used personal care products, triclosan (TCS) and galaxolide (HHCB) spiked to sediment, in the oligochaete worm Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri in water/sediment microcosms. After 7 days of sediment exposure to 3.1 μg of TCS or HHCB/g of dry weight sediment, the accumulation of TCS and HHCB in L. hoffmeisteri reached equilibrium, at which point the biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) were 2.07 and 2.50 for TCS and HHCB, respectively. The presence of L. hoffmeisteri significantly accelerated the dissipation of the levels of TCS and HHCB in the microcosms, with approximately 9.03 and 2.90% of TCS and HHCB, respectively, eliminated from the water/sediment systems after exposure for 14 days in the presence of worms. Two biotransformation products, methyl triclosan and triclosan O-sulfate, were identified for TCS in worm tissue, whereas only methyl triclosan was identified in the sediment. Unlike TCS, no evidence of biotransformation products was found for HHCB in either worm tissue or sediment. These experiments demonstrate that L. hoffmeisteri biotransformed TCS through methylation and sulfation, whereas HHCB biotransformation was undetectable.

Fate and effects of sediment-associated triclosan in subtropical freshwater microcosms
Peng, Feng-Jiao ; Diepens, Noël J. ; Pan, Chang-Gui ; Bracewell, Sally A. ; Ying, Guang-Guo ; Salvito, Daniel ; Selck, Henriette ; Brink, Paul J. Van den - \ 2018
Aquatic Toxicology 202 (2018). - ISSN 0166-445X - p. 117 - 125.
Benthic macroinvertebrates - Bioaccumulation - Dissipation - Partitioning - Toxicity

Triclosan (TCS) is an antibacterial agent that is commonly used in personal care products. Because of its sediment-binding properties, TCS exposure presents a potential threat to sediment-dwelling aquatic organisms. Currently our knowledge of the fate and effects of sediment-associated TCS in aquatic systems is limited. To understand the impact of sediment-associated TCS, we used microcosms to assess effects of TCS exposure on a diverse range of organisms selected to mimic a subtropical community, with an exposure period of 28 days. We included the oligochaete freshwater worm Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri to evaluate the interaction between sediment-associated TCS and sediment-dwelling organisms, including potential loss of TCS from the sediment due to biological activity and bioaccumulation. Benthic macroinvertebrate presence significantly increased the TCS levels from 0.013 ± 0.007 μg/L to 0.613 ± 0.030 μg/L in the overlying water through biological activity, posing a potential additional risk to pelagic species, but it did not result in a significant reduction of the sediment concentration. Furthermore, worms accumulated TCS with estimated Biota-Sediment-Accumulation-Factors (BSAFs) ranging between 0.38–3.55. Other than for algae, TCS at environmental concentrations did not affect the survival of the introduced organisms, including the L. hoffmeisteri. Our results demonstrate that, although TCS at currently detected maximum concentration may not have observable toxic effects on the benthic macroinvertebrates in the short term, it can lead to bioaccumulation in worms.

Occurrence and ecological risk assessment of emerging organic chemicals in urban rivers : Guangzhou as a case study in China
Peng, Feng Jiao ; Pan, Chang Gui ; Zhang, Min ; Zhang, Nai Sheng ; Windfeld, Ronja ; Salvito, Daniel ; Selck, Henriette ; Brink, Paul J. Van den; Ying, Guang Guo - \ 2017
Science of the Total Environment 589 (2017). - ISSN 0048-9697 - p. 46 - 55.
Ecological risk assessment - Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) - Occurrence - Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) - Urban rivers

Urban rivers may receive contamination from various sources including point sources like domestic sewage and nonpoint sources (e.g., runoff), resulting in contamination with various chemicals. This study investigated the occurrence of emerging organic contaminants (3 endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), and 17 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs)) in six urban rivers of a representative subtropical city, Guangzhou (southern China). Our results showed that EDCs and personal care products were frequently detected in the water phase and sediment phase. 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) was the most predominant compound with the highest concentration of 5050 ng/L in the water phase and 14,400 ng/g dry weight (dw) in the sediment. Generally, higher total concentrations of EDCs and PPCPs were detected in the four urban streams compared to the main stream Zhujiang River and the Liuxi River at the suburb area. A screening-level risk assessment showed that 4-nonylphenol and triclosan (TCS) pose potential risks to aquatic organisms in most sampling sites. For individual taxa, 4-NP may pose risks to various groups of aquatic organisms, while TCS only might pose high risks to algae. Capsule Higher contamination of EDCs and PPCPs was observed in rivers in urban area; 4-nonylphenol and triclosan showed RQs > 1 in > 70% of the reported area.

Fate and effect of sediment-associated triclosan in a freshwater microcosm setup: the relative importance of bioaccumulation and biotransformation
Windfeld, R. ; Roessink, I. ; Brink, P.J. van den; Salvito, D. ; Selck, H. - \ 2016
Explaining differences between Bioaccumulation Measurements in laboratory and field data through use of probabilistic modeling approach
Selck, H. ; Drouillard, K. ; Eisenreich, K. ; Koelmans, A.A. ; Palmqvist, A. ; Ruus, A. ; Salvito, D. ; Schultz, I. ; Stewart, R. ; Weisbrod, A. ; Brink, N.W. van den; Heuvel-Greve, M.J. van den - \ 2012
Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management 8 (2012)1. - ISSN 1551-3793 - p. 42 - 63.
In the regulatory context, bioaccumulation assessment is often hampered by substantial data uncertainty as well as by the poorly understood differences often observed between results from laboratory and field bioaccumulation studies. Bioaccumulation is a complex, multifaceted process, which calls for accurate error analysis. Yet, attempts to quantify and compare propagation of error in bioaccumulation metrics across species and chemicals are rare. Here, we quantitatively assessed the combined influence of physicochemical, physiological, ecological, and environmental parameters known to affect bioaccumulation for 4 species and 2 chemicals, to assess whether uncertainty in these factors can explain the observed differences among laboratory and field studies. The organisms evaluated in simulations including mayfly larvae, deposit-feeding polychaetes, yellow perch, and little owl represented a range of ecological conditions and biotransformation capacity. The chemicals, pyrene and the polychlorinated biphenyl congener PCB-153, represented medium and highly hydrophobic chemicals with different susceptibilities to biotransformation. An existing state of the art probabilistic bioaccumulation model was improved by accounting for bioavailability and absorption efficiency limitations, due to the presence of black carbon in sediment, and was used for probabilistic modeling of variability and propagation of error. Results showed that at lower trophic levels (mayfly and polychaete), variability in bioaccumulation was mainly driven by sediment exposure, sediment composition and chemical partitioning to sediment components, which was in turn dominated by the influence of black carbon. At higher trophic levels (yellow perch and the little owl), food web structure (i.e., diet composition and abundance) and chemical concentration in the diet became more important particularly for the most persistent compound, PCB-153. These results suggest that variation in bioaccumulation assessment is reduced most by improved identification of food sources as well as by accounting for the chemical bioavailability in food components. Improvements in the accuracy of aqueous exposure appear to be less relevant when applied to moderate to highly hydrophobic compounds, because this route contributes only marginally to total uptake. The determination of chemical bioavailability and the increase in understanding and qualifying the role of sediment components (black carbon, labile organic matter, and the like) on chemical absorption efficiencies has been identified as a key next steps. Integr Environ Assess Manag © 2011 SETAC
Explaining variability of bioaccumulation measurements (BCF, BAF, BSAF, BMF) in laboratory and field studies
Selck, H. ; Brink, N.W. van den; Drouillard, K. ; Eisenreich, K. ; Koelmans, A. ; Palmqvist, A. ; Salvito, D. ; Schultz, I. ; Stewart, R. ; Weisbrod, A. ; Heuvel-Greve, M.J. van den - \ 2010
In: 20th SETAC Europe congress, Seville, Spain, 23 May-27 May 2010. - Seville, Spain : - p. 47 - 47.
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