Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

    Records 1 - 12 / 12

    • help
    • print

      Print search results

    • export

      Export search results

    Check title to add to marked list
    Repositioning of the global epicentre of non-optimal cholesterol
    Taddei, Cristina ; Zhou, Bin ; Bixby, Honor ; Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M. ; Danaei, Goodarz ; Jackson, Rod T. ; Farzadfar, Farshad ; Sophiea, Marisa K. ; Cesare, Mariachiara Di; Iurilli, Maria Laura Caminia ; Martinez, Andrea Rodriguez ; Asghari, Golaleh ; Dhana, Klodian ; Gulayin, Pablo ; Kakarmath, Sujay ; Santero, Marilina ; Voortman, Trudy ; Riley, Leanne M. ; Cowan, Melanie J. ; Savin, Stefan ; Bennett, James E. ; Stevens, Gretchen A. ; Paciorek, Christopher J. ; Aekplakorn, Wichai ; Cifkova, Renata ; Giampaoli, Simona ; Kengne, Andre Pascal ; Khang, Young Ho ; Kuulasmaa, Kari ; Laxmaiah, Avula ; Margozzini, Paula ; Mathur, Prashant ; Nordestgaard, Børge G. ; Zhao, Dong ; Aadahl, Mette ; Abarca-Gómez, Leandra ; Rahim, Hanan Abdul ; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M. ; Acosta-Cazares, Benjamin ; Adams, Robert J. ; Ferrieres, Jean ; Geleijnse, Johanna M. ; He, Yuna ; Jacobs, Jeremy M. ; Kromhout, Daan ; Ma, Guansheng ; Dam, Rob M. van; Wang, Qian ; Wang, Ya Xing ; Wang, Ying Wei - \ 2020
    Nature 582 (2020)7810. - ISSN 0028-0836 - p. 73 - 77.

    High blood cholesterol is typically considered a feature of wealthy western countries1,2. However, dietary and behavioural determinants of blood cholesterol are changing rapidly throughout the world3 and countries are using lipid-lowering medications at varying rates. These changes can have distinct effects on the levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol, which have different effects on human health4,5. However, the trends of HDL and non-HDL cholesterol levels over time have not been previously reported in a global analysis. Here we pooled 1,127 population-based studies that measured blood lipids in 102.6 million individuals aged 18 years and older to estimate trends from 1980 to 2018 in mean total, non-HDL and HDL cholesterol levels for 200 countries. Globally, there was little change in total or non-HDL cholesterol from 1980 to 2018. This was a net effect of increases in low- and middle-income countries, especially in east and southeast Asia, and decreases in high-income western countries, especially those in northwestern Europe, and in central and eastern Europe. As a result, countries with the highest level of non-HDL cholesterol—which is a marker of cardiovascular risk—changed from those in western Europe such as Belgium, Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland and Malta in 1980 to those in Asia and the Pacific, such as Tokelau, Malaysia, The Philippines and Thailand. In 2017, high non-HDL cholesterol was responsible for an estimated 3.9 million (95% credible interval 3.7 million–4.2 million) worldwide deaths, half of which occurred in east, southeast and south Asia. The global repositioning of lipid-related risk, with non-optimal cholesterol shifting from a distinct feature of high-income countries in northwestern Europe, north America and Australasia to one that affects countries in east and southeast Asia and Oceania should motivate the use of population-based policies and personal interventions to improve nutrition and enhance access to treatment throughout the world.

    Rising rural body-mass index is the main driver of the global obesity epidemic in adults
    Bixby, Honor ; Bentham, James ; Zhou, Bin ; Cesare, Mariachiara Di; Paciorek, Christopher J. ; Bennett, James E. ; Taddei, Cristina ; Stevens, Gretchen A. ; Rodriguez-Martinez, Andrea ; Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M. ; Khang, Young Ho ; Sorić, Maroje ; Gregg, Edward W. ; Miranda, J.J. ; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A. ; Savin, Stefan ; Sophiea, Marisa K. ; Iurilli, Maria L.C. ; Solomon, Bethlehem D. ; Cowan, Melanie J. ; Riley, Leanne M. ; Danaei, Goodarz ; Bovet, Pascal ; Chirita-Emandi, Adela ; Hambleton, Ian R. ; Hayes, Alison J. ; Ikeda, Nayu ; Kengne, Andre P. ; Laxmaiah, Avula ; Li, Yanping ; McGarvey, Stephen T. ; Mostafa, Aya ; Neovius, Martin ; Starc, Gregor ; Zainuddin, Ahmad A. ; Abarca-Gómez, Leandra ; Abdeen, Ziad A. ; Abdrakhmanova, Shynar ; Abdul Ghaffar, Suhaila ; Abdul Hamid, Zargar ; Abubakar Garba, Jamila ; Ferrieres, Jean ; He, Yuna ; Jacobs, Jeremy M. ; Kromhout, Daan ; Ma, Guansheng ; Visser, Marjolein ; Wang, Qian ; Wang, Ya Xing ; Wang, Ying Wei - \ 2019
    Nature 569 (2019)7755. - ISSN 0028-0836 - p. 260 - 264.

    Body-mass index (BMI) has increased steadily in most countries in parallel with a rise in the proportion of the population who live in cities 1,2 . This has led to a widely reported view that urbanization is one of the most important drivers of the global rise in obesity 3–6 . Here we use 2,009 population-based studies, with measurements of height and weight in more than 112 million adults, to report national, regional and global trends in mean BMI segregated by place of residence (a rural or urban area) from 1985 to 2017. We show that, contrary to the dominant paradigm, more than 55% of the global rise in mean BMI from 1985 to 2017—and more than 80% in some low- and middle-income regions—was due to increases in BMI in rural areas. This large contribution stems from the fact that, with the exception of women in sub-Saharan Africa, BMI is increasing at the same rate or faster in rural areas than in cities in low- and middle-income regions. These trends have in turn resulted in a closing—and in some countries reversal—of the gap in BMI between urban and rural areas in low- and middle-income countries, especially for women. In high-income and industrialized countries, we noted a persistently higher rural BMI, especially for women. There is an urgent need for an integrated approach to rural nutrition that enhances financial and physical access to healthy foods, to avoid replacing the rural undernutrition disadvantage in poor countries with a more general malnutrition disadvantage that entails excessive consumption of low-quality calories.

    Rejoinder to Comments on Minasny et al., 2017 Soil carbon 4 per mille Geoderma 292, 59–86
    Minasny, Budiman ; Arrouays, Dominique ; McBratney, Alex B. ; Angers, Denis A. ; Chambers, Adam ; Chaplot, Vincent ; Chen, Zueng Sang ; Cheng, Kun ; Das, Bhabani S. ; Field, Damien J. ; Gimona, Alessandro ; Hedley, Carolyn ; Hong, Suk Young ; Mandal, Biswapati ; Malone, Brendan P. ; Marchant, Ben P. ; Martin, Manuel ; McConkey, Brian G. ; Mulder, Vera Leatitia ; O'Rourke, Sharon ; Richer-de-Forges, Anne C. ; Odeh, Inakwu ; Padarian, José ; Paustian, Keith ; Pan, Genxing ; Poggio, Laura ; Savin, Igor ; Stolbovoy, Vladimir ; Stockmann, Uta ; Sulaeman, Yiyi ; Tsui, Chun Chih ; Vågen, Tor Gunnar ; Wesemael, Bas van; Winowiecki, Leigh - \ 2018
    Geoderma 309 (2018). - ISSN 0016-7061 - p. 124 - 129.
    A dataset of spectral and biophysical measurements over Russian wheat fields
    Wit, A.J.W. de; Roerink, G.J. ; Virchenko, Oleg ; Kleschenko, Alexander ; Bartalev, Sergey ; Savin, Igor ; Plotnikov, Dmitry ; Defourny, Pierre ; Andrimont, Raphael d' - \ 2018
    Wageningen University & Research
    wheat - Russia - remote sensing - experimental data
    From 2011 to 2013 the MOCCCASIN project (MOnitoring Crops in Continental Climates through Asimillation of Satellite INformation) was carried out financed by the European Commission 7th Framework Programme. During the project, two field campaigns (2011 and 2012) were carried out at two sites (Odoyev and Plavsk) in the Tula region of Russia. During these two campaigns, observations were made at selected winter-wheat fields consisting of phenological stage, biomass samples, hemispherical photographs, spectral properties of the canopy and the soil as well as ancillary information about the field. Meteorological observations from synoptic and agrometeorological stations were collected from the stations in and surrounding the Tula region. Finally, a large trajectory throughout the whole Tula region was surveyed in order to collect fields with different crop types.
    A dataset of spectral and biophysical measurements over Russian wheat fields
    Wit, Allard de; Roerink, Gerbert ; Bartalev, Sergey ; Virchenko, Oleg ; Plotnikov, Dmitry ; Savin, Igor ; Kleschenko, Alexander - \ 2018
    ODjAR : open data journal for agricultural research 4 (2018). - ISSN 2352-6378 - p. 22 - 27.
    From 2011 to 2013 the MOCCCASIN project (MOnitoring Crops in Continental Climates through Asimillation of Satellite INformation) was carried out financed by the European Commission 7th Framework Programme. During the project, two field campaigns (2011 and 2012) were carried out at two sites (Odoyev and Plavsk) in the Tula region of Russia. During these two campaigns, observations were made at selected winter-wheat fields consisting of phenological stage, biomass samples, hemispherical photographs, spectral properties of the canopy and the soil as well as ancillary information about the field. Meteorological observations from synoptic and agrometeorological stations were collected from the stations in and surrounding the Tula region. Finally, a large trajectory throughout the whole Tula region was surveyed in order to collect fields with different crop types.
    Soil carbon 4 per mille
    Minasny, Budiman ; Malone, Brendan P. ; McBratney, Alex B. ; Angers, Denis A. ; Arrouays, Dominique ; Chambers, Adam ; Chaplot, Vincent ; Chen, Zueng Sang ; Cheng, Kun ; Das, Bhabani S. ; Field, Damien J. ; Gimona, Alessandro ; Hedley, Carolyn B. ; Hong, Suk Young ; Mandal, Biswapati ; Marchant, Ben P. ; Martin, Manuel ; McConkey, Brian G. ; Mulder, Vera Leatitia ; O'Rourke, Sharon ; Richer-de-Forges, Anne C. ; Odeh, Inakwu ; Padarian, José ; Paustian, Keith ; Pan, Genxing ; Poggio, Laura ; Savin, Igor ; Stolbovoy, Vladimir ; Stockmann, Uta ; Sulaeman, Yiyi ; Tsui, Chun Chih ; Vågen, Tor Gunnar ; Wesemael, Bas van; Winowiecki, Leigh - \ 2017
    Geoderma 292 (2017). - ISSN 0016-7061 - p. 59 - 86.
    Climate change - Greenhouse gases - Soil carbon - Soil carbon sequestration

    The ‘4 per mille Soils for Food Security and Climate’ was launched at the COP21 with an aspiration to increase global soil organic matter stocks by 4 per 1000 (or 0.4 %) per year as a compensation for the global emissions of greenhouse gases by anthropogenic sources. This paper surveyed the soil organic carbon (SOC) stock estimates and sequestration potentials from 20 regions in the world (New Zealand, Chile, South Africa, Australia, Tanzania, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, India, China Taiwan, South Korea, China Mainland, United States of America, France, Canada, Belgium, England & Wales, Ireland, Scotland, and Russia). We asked whether the 4 per mille initiative is feasible for the region. The outcomes highlight region specific efforts and scopes for soil carbon sequestration. Reported soil C sequestration rates globally show that under best management practices, 4 per mille or even higher sequestration rates can be accomplished. High C sequestration rates (up to 10 per mille) can be achieved for soils with low initial SOC stock (topsoil less than 30 t C ha− 1), and at the first twenty years after implementation of best management practices. In addition, areas which have reached equilibrium will not be able to further increase their sequestration. We found that most studies on SOC sequestration only consider topsoil (up to 0.3 m depth), as it is considered to be most affected by management techniques. The 4 per mille number was based on a blanket calculation of the whole global soil profile C stock, however the potential to increase SOC is mostly on managed agricultural lands. If we consider 4 per mille in the top 1m of global agricultural soils, SOC sequestration is between 2-3 Gt C year− 1, which effectively offset 20–35% of global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. As a strategy for climate change mitigation, soil carbon sequestration buys time over the next ten to twenty years while other effective sequestration and low carbon technologies become viable. The challenge for cropping farmers is to find disruptive technologies that will further improve soil condition and deliver increased soil carbon. Progress in 4 per mille requires collaboration and communication between scientists, farmers, policy makers, and marketeers.

    Worldwide trends in body-mass index, underweight, overweight, and obesity from 1975 to 2016: a pooled analysis of 2416 population-based measurement studies in 128·9 million children, adolescents, and adults
    Bentham, James ; Cesare, Mariachiara Di; Bilano, Ver ; Bixby, Honor ; Zhou, Bin ; Stevens, Gretchen A. ; Riley, Leanne M. ; Taddei, Cristina ; Hajifathalian, Kaveh ; Lu, Yuan ; Savin, Stefan ; Cowan, Melanie J. ; Paciorek, Christopher J. ; Chirita-Emandi, Adela ; Hayes, Alison J. ; Katz, Joanne ; Kelishadi, Roya ; Kengne, Andre Pascal ; Khang, Young Ho ; Laxmaiah, Avula ; Li, Yanping ; Ma, Jun ; Miranda, J.J. ; Mostafa, Aya ; Neovius, Martin ; Padez, Cristina ; Rampal, Lekhraj ; Zhu, Aubrianna ; Bennett, James E. ; Danaei, Goodarz ; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A. ; Ezzati, Majid ; Abarca-Gómez, Leandra ; Abdeen, Ziad A. ; Hamid, Zargar Abdul ; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M. ; Acosta-Cazares, Benjamin ; Acuin, Cecilia ; Adams, Robert J. ; Aekplakorn, Wichai ; Afsana, Kaosar ; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A. ; Ferrieres, Jean ; Jacobs, Jeremy M. ; Kromhout, Daan ; Ma, Guansheng ; Peeters, Petra H. ; Wang, Qian ; Wang, Ya Xing ; Wang, Ying Wei ; Geleijnse, J.M. - \ 2017
    The Lancet 390 (2017)10113. - ISSN 0140-6736 - p. 2627 - 2642.

    Background Underweight, overweight, and obesity in childhood and adolescence are associated with adverse health consequences throughout the life-course. Our aim was to estimate worldwide trends in mean body-mass index (BMI) and a comprehensive set of BMI categories that cover underweight to obesity in children and adolescents, and to compare trends with those of adults. Methods We pooled 2416 population-based studies with measurements of height and weight on 128·9 million participants aged 5 years and older, including 31·5 million aged 5–19 years. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2016 in 200 countries for mean BMI and for prevalence of BMI in the following categories for children and adolescents aged 5–19 years: more than 2 SD below the median of the WHO growth reference for children and adolescents (referred to as moderate and severe underweight hereafter), 2 SD to more than 1 SD below the median (mild underweight), 1 SD below the median to 1 SD above the median (healthy weight), more than 1 SD to 2 SD above the median (overweight but not obese), and more than 2 SD above the median (obesity). Findings Regional change in age-standardised mean BMI in girls from 1975 to 2016 ranged from virtually no change (−0·01 kg/m2 per decade; 95% credible interval −0·42 to 0·39, posterior probability [PP] of the observed decrease being a true decrease=0·5098) in eastern Europe to an increase of 1·00 kg/m2 per decade (0·69–1·35, PP>0·9999) in central Latin America and an increase of 0·95 kg/m2 per decade (0·64–1·25, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. The range for boys was from a non-significant increase of 0·09 kg/m2 per decade (−0·33 to 0·49, PP=0·6926) in eastern Europe to an increase of 0·77 kg/m2 per decade (0·50–1·06, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. Trends in mean BMI have recently flattened in northwestern Europe and the high-income English-speaking and Asia-Pacific regions for both sexes, southwestern Europe for boys, and central and Andean Latin America for girls. By contrast, the rise in BMI has accelerated in east and south Asia for both sexes, and southeast Asia for boys. Global age-standardised prevalence of obesity increased from 0·7% (0·4–1·2) in 1975 to 5·6% (4·8–6·5) in 2016 in girls, and from 0·9% (0·5–1·3) in 1975 to 7·8% (6·7–9·1) in 2016 in boys; the prevalence of moderate and severe underweight decreased from 9·2% (6·0–12·9) in 1975 to 8·4% (6·8–10·1) in 2016 in girls and from 14·8% (10·4–19·5) in 1975 to 12·4% (10·3–14·5) in 2016 in boys. Prevalence of moderate and severe underweight was highest in India, at 22·7% (16·7–29·6) among girls and 30·7% (23·5–38·0) among boys. Prevalence of obesity was more than 30% in girls in Nauru, the Cook Islands, and Palau; and boys in the Cook Islands, Nauru, Palau, Niue, and American Samoa in 2016. Prevalence of obesity was about 20% or more in several countries in Polynesia and Micronesia, the Middle East and north Africa, the Caribbean, and the USA. In 2016, 75 (44–117) million girls and 117 (70–178) million boys worldwide were moderately or severely underweight. In the same year, 50 (24–89) million girls and 74 (39–125) million boys worldwide were obese. Interpretation The rising trends in children's and adolescents' BMI have plateaued in many high-income countries, albeit at high levels, but have accelerated in parts of Asia, with trends no longer correlated with those of adults. Funding Wellcome Trust, AstraZeneca Young Health Programme.

    GlobalSoilMap for Soil Organic Carbon Mapping and as a Basis for Global Modeling
    Arrouays, D. ; Minasny, B. ; McBratney, A. ; Grundy, Mike ; McKenzie, Neil ; Thompson, James ; Gimona, Alessandro ; Hong, Suk Young ; Smith, Scott ; Hartemink, A.E. ; Chen, Songchao ; Martin, Manuel P. ; Mulder, V.L. ; Richer-de-Forges, A.C. ; Odeh, Inakwu ; Padarian, José ; Lelyk, Glenn ; Poggio, Laura ; Savin, Igor ; Stolbovoy, Vladimir ; Leenaars, J.G.B. ; Heuvelink, G.B.M. ; Montanarella, Luca ; Panagos, P. ; Hempel, Jon - \ 2017
    In: Proceedings of the global symposium on soil organic carbon 2017. - FAO - p. 27 - 30.
    The demand for information on functional soil properties is high and has increased over time. This is especially true for soil organic carbon (SOC) in the framework of food security and climate change. The GlobalSoilMap consortium was established in response to such a soaring demand for up-to-date and relevant soil information. The majority of the data needed to produce GlobalSoilMap soil property maps will, at least for the first generation, come mainly from archived soil legacy data, which could include polygon soil maps and point pedon data, and from available co-variates such as climatic data, remote sensing information, geological data, and other forms of environmental information.
    Several countries have already released products according to the GlobalSoilMap specifications and the project is rejuvenating soil survey and mapping in many parts of the world. Functional soil property maps have been produced using digital soil mapping techniques and existing legacy information and made available to the user community for application. In addition, uncertainty has been provided as a 90% prediction interval based on estimated upper and lower class limits. We believe that GlobalSoilMap constitutes the best available framework and methodology to address global issues about SOC mapping. Main scientific challenges include time related and uncertainties issues.
    GlobalSoilMap - Digital Soil Mapping from Country to Globe : Proceedings of the Global Soil Map 2017 Conference, July 4-6, 2017, Moscow, Russia
    Arrouays, Dominique ; Savin, Igor ; Leenaars, J.G.B. ; McBratney, Alex B. - \ 2017
    CRC Press - ISBN 9780815375487 - 174 p.
    Genotype by Environment Interaction and Adaptation
    Romagosa, I. ; Borràs-Gelonch, G. ; Slafer, G. ; Eeuwijk, F.A. van - \ 2013
    In: Sustainable Food Production / Christou, P., Savin, R., New York : Springer Verlag - ISBN 9781461457961 - p. 846 - 870.
    Climatically optimal planting dates : (COP determinator version 1)
    Savin, I. ; Leo, O. ; Boogaard, H.L. ; Diepen, C.A. van; Ham, H.B.M. van der - \ 2007
    Ispra : JRC (PUBSY 7094 EUR 22233 EN - 2007) - 57 p.
    Monitoring drought affected crop yields based on ERS-scatterometer data : exploration of possibilities to integrate ERS-scatterometer derived soil moisture into the CGMS crop model for a Russian-Ukrainian study area
    Boogaard, H.L. ; Diepen, C.A. van; Savin, I. - \ 2000
    Wageningen : Alterra (Alterra-rapport 9) - 95
    gewasopbrengst - droogte - bodemwater - meteorologie - modellen - satellieten - monitoring - remote sensing - oogstfactoren - stress omstandigheden - agronomie - oekraïne - gerst - crop yield - drought - soil water - meteorology - models - satellites - monitoring - remote sensing - yield factors - stress conditions - agronomy - ukraine - barley
    In this study the possibilities of integrating ERS scatterometer-derived soil moisture into CGMS are explored. This remote sensed soil moisture is used to calculate drought stress in grains of barley for a Russian-Ukrainian study area. The results arecompared with drought stress based on the rainfall-driven water balance and with regional yields statistics of barley. The use of ERS scatterometer in CGMS seems promising, especially when additional input data such as sowing dates and crop parameters are improved and conversions of ERS scatterometer data into soil moisture are more specified for different soils and seasonal variations.
    Check title to add to marked list

    Show 20 50 100 records per page

     
    Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.