Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Recent Advances in Forest Observation with Visual Interpretation of Very High-Resolution Imagery
Schepaschenko, Dmitry ; See, Linda ; Lesiv, Myroslava ; Bastin, Jean-François ; Mollicone, Danilo ; Tsendbazar, Nandin-Erdene ; Bastin, Lucy ; McCallum, Ian ; Laso Bayas, Juan Carlos ; Baklanov, Artem ; Perger, Christoph ; Dürauer, Martina ; Fritz, Steffen - \ 2019
Surveys in Geophysics 40 (2019)4. - ISSN 0169-3298 - p. 839 - 862.
The land area covered by freely available very high-resolution (VHR) imagery has grown dramatically over recent years, which has considerable relevance for forest observation and monitoring. For example, it is possible to recognize and extract a number of features related to forest type, forest management, degradation and disturbance using VHR imagery. Moreover, time series of medium-to-high-resolution imagery such as MODIS, Landsat or Sentinel has allowed for monitoring of parameters related to forest cover change. Although automatic classification is used regularly to monitor forests using medium-resolution imagery, VHR imagery and changes in web-based technology have opened up new possibilities for the role of visual interpretation in forest observation. Visual interpretation of VHR is typically employed to provide training and/or validation data for other remote sensing-based techniques or to derive statistics directly on forest cover/forest cover change over large regions. Hence, this paper reviews the state of the art in tools designed for visual interpretation of VHR, including Geo-Wiki, LACO-Wiki and Collect Earth as well as issues related to interpretation of VHR imagery and approaches to quality assurance. We have also listed a number of success stories where visual interpretation plays a crucial role, including a global forest mask harmonized with FAO FRA country statistics; estimation of dryland forest area; quantification of deforestation; national reporting to the UNFCCC; and drivers of forest change.
The Importance of Consistent Global Forest Aboveground Biomass Product Validation
Duncanson, L. ; Armston, J. ; Disney, M. ; Avitabile, V. ; Barbier, N. ; Calders, K. ; Carter, S. ; Chave, J. ; Herold, M. ; Crowther, T.W. ; Falkowski, M. ; Kellner, J.R. ; Labrière, N. ; Lucas, R. ; Macbean, N. ; Mcroberts, R.E. ; Meyer, V. ; Næsset, E. ; Nickeson, J.E. ; Paul, K.I. ; Phillips, O.L. ; Réjou-méchain, M. ; Román, M. ; Roxburgh, S. ; Saatchi, S. ; Schepaschenko, D. ; Scipal, K. ; Siqueira, P.R. ; Whitehurst, A. ; Williams, M. - \ 2019
Surveys in Geophysics 40 (2019)4. - ISSN 0169-3298 - p. 979 - 999.
Several upcoming satellite missions have core science requirements to produce data for accurate forest aboveground biomass mapping. Largely because of these mission datasets, the number of available biomass products is expected to greatly increase over the coming decade. Despite the recognized importance of biomass mapping for a wide range of science, policy and management applications, there remains no community accepted standard for satellite-based biomass map validation. The Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS) is developing a protocol to fill this need in advance of the next generation of biomass-relevant satellites, and this paper presents a review of biomass validation practices from a CEOS perspective. We outline the wide range of anticipated user requirements for product accuracy assessment and provide recommendations for the validation of biomass products. These recommendations include the collection of new, high-quality in situ data and the use of airborne lidar biomass maps as tools toward transparent multi-resolution validation. Adoption of community-vetted validation standards and practices will facilitate the uptake of the next generation of biomass products.
The global forest age dataset and its uncertainties (GFADv1.1)
Poulter, B. ; Aragão, L. ; Andela, N. ; Bellassen, V. ; Ciais, P. ; Kato, T. ; Lin, X. ; Nachin, B. ; Luyssaert, S. ; Pederson, N. ; Peylin, P. ; Piao, S. ; Pugh, T. ; Saatchi, S. ; Schepaschenko, D. ; Schelhaas, M. ; Shivdenko, A. - \ 2019
The global forest age dataset (GFAD v.1.1) provides a correction to GFAD v1.0, as well as its uncertainties. GFAD describes the age distributions of plant functional types (PFT) on a 0.5-degree grid. Each grid cell contains information on the fraction of each PFT within an age class. The four PFTs, needleaf evergreen (NEEV), needleleaf deciduous (NEDE), broadleaf evergreen (BREV) and broadleaf deciduous (BRDC) are mapped from the MODIS Collection 5.1 land cover dataset, crosswalking land cover types to PFT fractions. The source of data for the age distributions is from country-level forest inventory for temperate and high-latitude countries, and from biomass for tropical countries. The inventory and biomass data are related to fifteen age classes defined in ten-year intervals, from 1-10 up to a class greater than 150 years old. The uncertainties are estimated for the inventory derived forest age classes as +/- 40% of the mean age. For the areas where age is derived from aboveground biomass, the uncertainty is derived from the 5th and 95th percentile estimates of biomass, but using the same age-aboveground biomass curves. The GFAD dataset represents the 2000-2010 era.
The global forest age dataset (GFADv1.0), link to NetCDF file
Poulter, B. ; Aragão, L. ; Andela, N. ; Bellassen, V. ; Ciais, P. ; Kato, T. ; Lin, X. ; Nachin, B. ; Luyssaert, S. ; Pederson, N. ; Peylin, P. ; Piao, S. ; Saatchi, S. ; Schepaschenko, D. ; Schelhaas, M. ; Shivdenko, A. - \ 2018
The global forest age dataset (GFAD) describes the age distributions of plant functional types (PFT) on a 0.5-degree grid. Each grid cell contains information on the fraction of each PFT within an age class. The four PFTs, needleaf evergreen (NEEV), needleleaf deciduous (NEDE), broadleaf evergreen (BREV) and broadleaf deciduous (BRDC) are mapped from the MODIS Collection 5.1 land cover dataset, crosswalking land cover types to PFT fractions. The source of data for the age distributions is from country-level forest inventory for temperate and high-latitude countries, and from biomass for tropical countries. The inventory and biomass data are related to fifteen age classes defined in ten-year intervals, from 1-10 up to a class greater than 150 years old. The GFAD dataset represents the 2000-2010 era.
Independent data for transparent monitoring of greenhouse gas emissions from the land use sector – What do stakeholders think and need?
Romijn, Erika ; Sy, Veronique De; Herold, Martin ; Böttcher, Hannes ; Roman-Cuesta, Rosa Maria ; Fritz, Steffen ; Schepaschenko, Dmitry ; Avitabile, Valerio ; Gaveau, David ; Verchot, Louis ; Martius, Christopher - \ 2018
Environmental Science & Policy 85 (2018). - ISSN 1462-9011 - p. 101 - 112.
The agriculture, forestry and other land use (AFOLU) sectors contribute substantially to the net global anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To reduce these emissions under the Paris Agreement, effective mitigation actions are needed that require engagement of multiple stakeholders. Emission reduction also requires that accurate, consistent and comparable datasets are available for transparent reference and progress monitoring. Availability of free and open datasets and portals (referred to as independent data) increases, offering opportunities for improving and reconciling estimates of GHG emissions and mitigation options. Through an online survey, we investigated stakeholders’ data needs for estimating forest area and change, forest biomass and emission factors, and AFOLU GHG emissions. The survey was completed by 359 respondents from governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, research institutes and universities, and public and private companies. These can be grouped into data users and data providers. Our results show that current open and freely available datasets and portals are only able to fulfil stakeholder needs to a certain degree. Users require a) detailed documentation regarding the scope and usability of the data, b) comparability between alternative data sources, c) uncertainty estimates for evaluating mitigation options, d) more region-specific and detailed data with higher accuracy for sub-national application, e) regular updates and continuity for establishing consistent time series. These requirements are found to be key elements for increasing overall transparency of data sources, definitions, methodologies and assumptions, which is required under the Paris
Agreement. Raising awareness and improving data availability through centralized platforms are important for increasing engagement of data users. In countries with low capacities, independent data can support countries’
mitigation planning and implementation, and related GHG reporting. However, there is a strong need for further guidance and capacity development (i.e.‘
readiness support’) on how to make proper use of independent datasets. Continued investments will be needed to sustain programmes and keep improving datasets to serve the objectives of the many stakeholders involved in climate change mitigation and should focus on increased accessibility and transparency of data to encourage stakeholder involvement.
Towards a Global In Situ Forest Biomass Database and a Strategy for Validation of Global Biomass Maps
Avitabile, V. ; Schepaschenko, D. ; Balzter, Heiko ; Carreiras, J. ; Herold, M. - \ 2016
Independent Monitoring and New Technologies Supporting REDD+ and Land Use Sector Mitigation
Herold, M. ; Martius, Christopher ; Avitabile, V. ; Seifert, Frank Martin ; Fritz, S. ; Schepaschenko, D. ; Boetcher, H. ; Roman Cuesta, Rosa Maria ; Bucki, Mika ; Gaveau, D. - \ 2016
Strengthening Independent Monitoring of GHG Emissions from Land Activities for Publishing, Comparing and Reconciling Estimates : First progress report. N° CLIMA.A.2/ETU/2014/0008
Böttcher, H. ; Herold, M. ; Romijn, J.E. ; Roman Cuesta, Rosa Maria ; Fritz, S. ; Schepaschenko, D. ; Dunwoody, A. ; Martius, C. ; Gaveau, D. - \ 2015
WageningenUR
An estimate of the terrestrial carbon budget of Russia using inventory based, eddy covariance and inversion methods
Dolman, A.J. ; Shvidenko, A. ; Schepaschenko, D. ; Ciais, P. ; Tchebakova, N. ; Chen, T. ; Molen, M.K. van der; Belelli Marchesini, L. ; Maximov, T.C. ; Maksyutov, S. ; Schulze, E.D. - \ 2012
Biogeosciences 9 (2012). - ISSN 1726-4170 - p. 5323 - 5340.
global vegetation models - net ecosystem exchange - land-use change - climate-change - forest ecosystems - permafrost carbon - boreal ecosystems - co2 sources - balance - siberia
We determine the net land to atmosphere flux of carbon in Russia, including Ukraine, Belarus and Kazakhstan, using inventory-based, eddy covariance, and inversion methods. Our high boundary estimate is -342 Tg C yr-1 from the eddy covariance method, and this is close to the upper bounds of the inventory-based Land Ecosystem Assessment and inverse models estimates. A lower boundary estimate is provided at -1350 Tg C yr-1 from the inversion models. The average of the three methods is -613.5 Tg C yr-1. The methane emission is estimated separately at 41.4 Tg C yr-1. These three methods agree well within their respective error bounds. There is thus good consistency between bottom-up and top-down methods. The forests of Russia primarily cause the net atmosphere to land flux (-692 Tg C yr-1 from the LEA. It remains however remarkable that the three methods provide such close estimates (-615, -662, -554 Tg C yr–1) for net biome production (NBP), given the inherent uncertainties in all of the approaches. The lack of recent forest inventories, the few eddy covariance sites and associated uncertainty with upscaling and undersampling of concentrations for the inversions are among the prime causes of the uncertainty. The dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) suggest a much lower uptake at -91 Tg C yr-1, and we argue that this is caused by a high estimate of heterotrophic respiration compared to other methods.
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