Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Season-specific carryover of early life associations in a monogamous bird species
    Kurvers, Ralf H.J.M. ; Prox, Lea ; Farine, Damien R. ; Jongeling, Coretta ; Snijders, Lysanne - \ 2020
    Animal Behaviour 164 (2020). - ISSN 0003-3472 - p. 25 - 37.
    aggression - early life - familiarity - genetic relatedness - monogamous - pair formation - social associations - social relationships

    Social relationships can have important fitness consequences. Although there is increasing evidence that social relationships carry over across contexts, few studies have investigated whether relationships formed early in life are carried over to adulthood. For example, juveniles of monogamous species go through a major life history stage transition, pair formation, during which the pair bond becomes a central unit of the social organization. At present, it remains unclear whether pair members retain their early life relationships after pair formation. We investigated whether same-sex associations formed early in life carry over into adulthood and whether carryover was dependent on season, in a monogamous species. We also investigated the role of familiarity, genetic relatedness and aggression on the perseverance of social associations. We studied the social structure before and after pair formation in captive barnacle geese, Branta leucopsis, a highly social, long-lived, monogamous species. We constructed association networks of groups of geese before pair formation, during the subsequent breeding season and in the following wintering season. Next, we studied how these associations carried over during seasonal changes. We found that early life associations in females were lost during the breeding season but resurfaced during the subsequent wintering season. In males, the early life associations persisted across both seasons. Association persistence was not mediated by genetic relatedness or familiarity. The high level of aggressiveness of males, but not females, in the breeding season suggests that males may have played a key role in shaping both their own social environment and that of their partners. We show that early life social relationships can be maintained well into later life. Such relationships can be sustained even if they are temporarily disrupted, for example due to reproductive behaviour. Our findings therefore highlight that the early life social environment can have lifelong consequences for individuals’ social environment.

    Repeatability of signalling traits in the avian dawn chorus
    Naguib, Marc ; Diehl, Joris ; Oers, Kees van; Snijders, Lysanne - \ 2019
    Frontiers in Zoology 16 (2019). - ISSN 1742-9994
    Animal communication - Behavioural repeatability - Bird song - Dawn chorus - Dawn song - Great tit - Singing activity - Song repertoire

    Background: Birdsong, a key model in animal communication studies, has been the focus of intensive research. Song traits are commonly considered to reflect differences in individual or territory quality. Yet, few studies have quantified the variability of song traits between versus within individuals (i.e. repeatability), and thus whether certain song traits indeed provide reliable individual-specific information. Here, we studied the dawn chorus of male great tits (Parus major) to determine if key song traits are repeatable over multiple days and during different breeding stages. Additionally, we examined whether repeatability was associated with exploration behaviour, a relevant personality trait. Finally, we tested if variation in song traits could be explained by breeding stage, lowest night temperature, and exploration behaviour. Results: We show that the start time of an individual's dawn song was indeed repeatable within and across breeding stages, and was more repeatable before, than during, their mate's egg laying stage. Males started singing later when the preceding night was colder. Daily repertoire size was repeatable, though to a lesser extent than song start time, and no differences were observed between breeding stages. We did not find evidence for an association between exploration behaviour and variation in dawn song traits. Repertoire composition, and specifically the start song type, varied across days, but tended to differ less than expected by chance. Conclusions: Our findings that individuals consistently differ in key song traits provides a better understanding of the information receivers can obtain when sampling songs of different males. Surprisingly, start time, despite being influenced by a highly variable environmental factor, appeared to be a more reliable signal of individual differences than repertoire size. Against expectation, singers were more repeatable before than during their mate's egg laying stage, possibly because before egg laying, females are less constrained to move around unguarded and thus may then already sample (and compare) different singers. Combining repeated dawn song recordings with spatial tracking could reveal if the sampling strategies of receivers are indeed important drivers of repeatability of song traits. Such a complementary approach will further advance our insights into the dynamics and evolution of animal signalling systems.

    Muscle mass and strength gains following 6 months of resistance type exercise training are only partly preserved within one year with autonomous exercise continuation in older adults
    Snijders, T. ; Leenders, M. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Loon, Luc J.C. van; Verdijk, Lex B. - \ 2019
    Experimental Gerontology 121 (2019). - ISSN 0531-5565 - p. 71 - 78.
    Introduction Although resistance type exercise training (RT) effectively increases muscle mass and strength in older individuals, it remains unclear whether gains in muscle mass and strength are maintained without continued supervised training. We assessed the capacity of older individuals to maintain muscle mass and strength gains one year after partaking in a successful RT program. Methods Fifty-three healthy older adults performed a 24-wk supervised RT program. Upon the cessation of the training program, participants were not provided with any advice or incentives to continue exercise training. One year after completion of the training program, all participants were contacted and invited back to the laboratory to assess anthropometrics, body composition (DXA), quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) (CT-scan), muscle strength (1RM knee extension/leg press), and muscle fiber characteristics (muscle biopsy). Following primary analyses on all participants that responded to the invitation (n = 35), participants were divided into two groups: individuals who had continued to perform exercise training on an individual basis (EXER group; n = 16) and individuals who had not continued to perform any regular exercise (STOP group; n = 19) after completing the RT program. Results The initial increases in quadriceps CSA (+506 ± 209 and +584 ± 287 mm2) and knee extension strength (+32 ± 12 vs +34 ± 10 kg) after the 24-wk RT program did not differ between the STOP and EXER group (all P > 0.05). One year after discontinuation of the RT program, participants had lost muscle mass (P < 0.01), with a greater decline in quadriceps CSA in the STOP vs EXER group (−579 ± 268 vs −309
    Nandrolone decanoate administration does not attenuate muscle atrophy during a short period of disuse
    Horstman, Astrid M.H. ; Backx, Evelien M.P. ; Smeets, Joey S.J. ; Marzuca-Nassr, Gabriel N. ; Kranenburg, Janneau van; Boer, Douwe de; Dolmans, John ; Snijders, Tim ; Verdijk, Lex B. ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. de; Loon, Luc J.C. van - \ 2019
    PLoS ONE 14 (2019)1. - ISSN 1932-6203 - p. e0210823 - e0210823.

    BACKGROUND: A few days of bed rest or immobilization following injury, disease, or surgery can lead to considerable loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. It has been speculated that such short, successive periods of muscle disuse may be largely responsible for the age-related loss of muscle mass throughout the lifespan. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether a single intramuscular injection of nandrolone decanoate prior to immobilization can attenuate the loss of muscle mass and strength in vivo in humans. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Thirty healthy (22 ± 1 years) men were subjected to 7 days of one-legged knee immobilization by means of a full leg cast with (NAD, n = 15) or without (CON, n = 15) prior intramuscular nandrolone decanoate injection (200 mg). MEASURES: Before and immediately after immobilization, quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) (by means of single-slice computed tomography (CT) scans of the upper leg) and one-legged knee extension strength (one-repetition maximum [1-RM]) were assessed for both legs. Furthermore, muscle biopsies from the immobilized leg were taken before and after immobilization to assess type I and type II muscle fiber cross-sectional area. RESULTS: Quadriceps muscle CSA decreased during immobilization in both CON and NAD (-6 ± 1% and -6 ± 1%, respectively; main effect of time P<0.01), with no differences between the groups (time × treatment interaction, P = 0.59). Leg muscle strength declined following immobilization (-6 ± 2% in CON and -7 ± 3% in NAD; main effect of time, P<0.05), with no differences between groups (time × treatment interaction, P = 0.55). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to report that nandrolone decanoate administration does not preserve skeletal muscle mass and strength during a short period of leg immobilization in vivo in humans.

    Leucine Supplementation Does Not Attenuate Skeletal Muscle Loss during Leg Immobilization in Healthy, Young Men
    Backx, E.M.P. ; Horstman, A.M.H. ; Marzuca-Nassr, G.N. ; Kranenburg, J. van; Smeets, J.S. ; Fuchs, C.J. ; Janssen, A.A.W. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Snijders, T. ; Verdijk, L.B. ; Loon, L.J.C. van - \ 2018
    Nutrients 10 (2018)5. - ISSN 2072-6643
    Background: Short successive periods of physical inactivity occur throughout life and contribute considerably to the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass. The maintenance of muscle mass during brief periods of disuse is required to prevent functional decline and maintain metabolic health. Objective: To assess whether daily leucine supplementation during a short period of disuse can attenuate subsequent muscle loss in vivo in humans. Methods: Thirty healthy (22 ± 1 y) young males were exposed to a 7-day unilateral knee immobilization intervention by means of a full leg cast with (LEU, n = 15) or without (CON, n = 15) daily leucine supplementation (2.5 g leucine, three times daily). Prior to and directly after immobilization, quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (computed tomography (CT) scan) and leg strength (one-repetition maximum (1-RM)) were assessed. Furthermore, muscle biopsies were taken in both groups before and after immobilization to assess changes in type I and type II muscle fiber CSA. Results: Quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) declined in the CON and LEU groups (p < 0.01), with no differences between the two groups (from 7712 ± 324 to 7287 ± 305 mm2 and from 7643 ± 317 to 7164 ± 328 mm2; p = 0.61, respectively). Leg muscle strength decreased from 56 ± 4 to 53 ± 4 kg in the CON group and from 63 ± 3 to 55 ± 2 kg in the LEU group (main effect of time p < 0.01), with no differences between the groups (p = 0.052). Type I and II muscle fiber size did not change significantly over time, in both groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Free leucine supplementation with each of the three main meals (7.5 g/d) does not attenuate the decline of muscle mass and strength during a 7-day limb immobilization intervention.
    Animal Social Network Theory Can Help Wildlife Conservation
    Snijders, Lysanne ; Blumstein, Daniel T. ; Stanley, Christina R. ; Franks, Daniel W. - \ 2017
    Trends in Ecology and Evolution 32 (2017)8. - ISSN 0169-5347 - p. 567 - 577.
    Animal social network analysis - Behavior-based management - Conservation biology - Social connectivity - Wildlife management

    Many animals preferentially associate with certain other individuals. This social structuring can influence how populations respond to changes to their environment, thus making network analysis a promising technique for understanding, predicting, and potentially manipulating population dynamics. Various network statistics can correlate with individual fitness components and key population-level processes, yet the logical role and formal application of animal social network theory for conservation and management have not been well articulated. We outline how understanding of direct and indirect relationships between animals can be profitably applied by wildlife managers and conservationists. By doing so, we aim to stimulate the development and implementation of practical tools for wildlife conservation and management and to inspire novel behavioral research in this field. Understanding social network structure and position can aid wildlife conservation.Threatened wildlife populations offer a vital experimental platform for animal SNA.Linking animal SNA to practice stimulates design of new practical tools and theory.

    Dominance rank and boldness predict social attraction in great tits
    Snijders, Lysanne ; Naguib, Marc ; Oers, Kees van - \ 2017
    Behavioral Ecology 28 (2017)2. - ISSN 1045-2249 - p. 398 - 406.
    Boldness - Dominance - Exploration - Great tits - Social attraction - Video playback

    Social relationships can have important fitness consequences, and how well an individual is socially connected often correlates with other behavioral traits. Whether such correlations are caused by underlying individual differences in social attraction usually remains unclear, because to identify effects of individual traits on social attraction, it is essential to experimentally exclude the influence of the social partner. Using standardized high-definition video playback on captive great tits (Parus major), we effectively demonstrate the influence of individual traits on the motivation to be near a conspecific. We show that social attraction varied contrastingly with boldness and stimulus novelty. Shyer birds tended to show stronger social attraction when they were confronted with the stimulus bird for the first time. Lower ranked birds showed the overall strongest social attraction. This rank effect remained after experimentally changing dominance ranks by altering group compositions. Moreover, preference for social association tended to increase with a decrease in dominance rank, suggesting that birds plastically change their social preference in relation to their within-group dominance status. Our results provide insight into how social relations can form and change, processes that are key for understanding the long-term consequences of the social environment, and the role individuals might play in influencing this environment themselves.

    Data from: Sex-specific responses to territorial intrusions in a communication network: evidence from radio-tagged great tits
    Snijders, L. ; Oers, Kees van; Naguib, M. - \ 2017
    communication network - animal social network - sexual selection - eavesdropping - social information - signaling - Parus major
    This file includes all the data used for the statistical analyses in the manuscript. The data include information on the experimental stimuli, the subject's individual traits, vocal response, spatial response, and the neighborhood response (3 sheets). An additional sheet provides the legend for the column names.
    Communication in Animal Social Networks : A Missing Link?
    Snijders, Lysanne ; Naguib, Marc - \ 2017
    In: Advances in the Study of Behavior / Naguib, Marc, Podos, Jeffrey, Simmons, Leigh W., Barrett, Louise, Healy, Susan D., Zuk, Marlene, Academic Press (Advances in the Study of Behavior ) - ISBN 9780128121214 - p. 297 - 359.
    Animal communication - Communication networks - Movement ecology - Noise - Signaling - Social bonds - Social networks - Spatial ecology

    Animal social networks and animal communication networks are key disciplines for understanding animal social behavior, yet these disciplines remain poorly integrated. In this review, we show how communication and social networks are inherently linked, with social signals reflecting and affecting social networks. Signals carry key information on the quality and direction of social connections and reveal social connections over long distances. Moreover, social signals can directly affect proximity among conspecifics, by facilitating social attraction and repulsion. Social signals thus mediate many of the social networks we observe. Throughout, we discuss a broad range of signal types and interactions, yet with a focus on acoustic signals and show how they reflect and affect social relationships. With this review we aim to inspire further integration of the social network and communication network disciplines, expecting that it will lead to new insights into the dynamics and evolution of animal social behavior.

    Taking multi-morbidity into account when attributing DALYs to risk factors : comparing dynamic modeling with the GBD2010 calculation method
    Boshuizen, Hendriek C. ; Nusselder, Wilma J. ; Plasmans, Marjanne H.D. ; Hilderink, Henk H. ; Snijders, Bianca E.P. ; Poos, René ; Gool, Coen H. van - \ 2017
    BMC Public Health 17 (2017). - ISSN 1471-2458
    Comorbidity - Disability weights - Incidence - Multi-morbidity - Prevalence - Risk factor attribution

    Background: Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) quantify the loss of healthy years of life due to dying prematurely and due to living with diseases and injuries. Current methods of attributing DALYs to underlying risk factors fall short on two main points. First, risk factor attribution methods often unjustly apply incidence-based population attributable fractions (PAFs) to prevalence-based data. Second, it mixes two conceptually distinct approaches targeting different goals, namely an attribution method aiming to attribute uniquely to a single cause, and an elimination method aiming to describe a counterfactual situation without exposure. In this paper we describe dynamic modeling as an alternative, completely counterfactual approach and compare this to the approach used in the Global Burden of Disease 2010 study (GBD2010). Methods: Using data on smoking in the Netherlands in 2011, we demonstrate how an alternative method of risk factor attribution using a pure counterfactual approach results in different estimates for DALYs. This alternative method is carried out using the dynamic multistate disease table model DYNAMO-HIA. We investigate the differences between our alternative method and the method used by the GBD2010 by doing additional analyses using data from a synthetic population in steady state. Results: We observed important differences between the outcomes of the two methods: in an artificial situation where dynamics play a limited role, DALYs are a third lower as compared to those calculated with the GBD2010 method (398,000 versus 607,000 DALYs). The most important factor is newly occurring morbidity in life years gained that is ignored in the GBD2010 approach. Age-dependent relative risks and exposures lead to additional differences between methods as they distort the results of prevalence-based DALY calculations, but the direction and magnitude of the distortions depend on the particular situation. Conclusions: We argue that the GBD2010 approach is a hybrid of an attributional and counterfactual approach, making the end result hard to understand, while dynamic modelling uses a purely counterfactual approach and thus yields better interpretable results.

    Context-dependent effects of radio transmitter attachment on a small passerine
    Snijders, Lysanne ; Nieuwe Weme, Lydia ; Goede, Piet de; Savage, James L. ; Oers, Kees van; Naguib, Marc - \ 2017
    Journal of Avian Biology 48 (2017)5. - ISSN 0908-8857 - p. 650 - 659.
    Biotelemetry devices provide unprecedented insights into the spatial behaviour and ecology of many animals. Quantifying the potential effects of attaching such devices to animals is essential, but certain effects may appear only in specific or particularly stressful contexts. Here we analyse the effects of radio transmitter attachment on great tits Parus major tagged over three environmentally dissimilar years, as part of a project studying social- and communication networks. When we radio-tagged birds before breeding, only those tagged in the coldest spring tended to be less likely to breed than control birds. Breeding probability was independent of relative transmitter weight (between 5 and 8% bodyweight). When we radio-tagged both parents during nestling provisioning (transmitter weight between 6 and 8%), tagged parents were more likely than control parents to desert their brood in two out of three years, while in the other year no tagged parents deserted. Tagged parents provisioning larger broods were most likely to desert, especially during lower average temperatures. Video analyses did not reveal any transmitter effects on provisioning behaviour of parents in the year with no desertion. We conclude that radio tagging before breeding did not lead to negative effects, regardless of transmitter weight, but that decisions about radio-tagging both parents during nestling provisioning need to be made with exceptional care, taking both environmental context and transmitter weight into account. Reporting results from long-term radio-tracking studies comprising several environmentally variable years is crucial to understand and predict potential transmitter effects and maximise the tremendous potential of biotelemetry. Journal of Avian Biology
    Creatine Loading Does Not Preserve Muscle Mass or Strength During Leg Immobilization in Healthy, Young Males : A Randomized Controlled Trial
    Backx, Evelien M.P. ; Hangelbroek, Roland ; Snijders, Tim ; Verscheijden, Marie Louise ; Verdijk, Lex B. ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. de; Loon, Luc J.C. van - \ 2017
    Sports Medicine 47 (2017)8. - ISSN 0112-1642 - p. 1661 - 1671.

    Background: A short period of leg immobilization leads to rapid loss of muscle mass and strength. Creatine supplementation has been shown to increase lean body mass in active individuals and can be used to augment gains in muscle mass and strength during prolonged resistance-type exercise training. Objective: Our objective was to investigate whether creatine loading can attenuate the loss of muscle mass and strength during short-term leg immobilization. Methods: Healthy young men (n = 30; aged 23 ± 1 years; body mass index [BMI] 23.3 ± 0.5 kg/m−2) were randomly assigned to either a creatine or a placebo group. Subjects received placebo or creatine supplements (20 g/d) for 5 days before one leg was immobilized by means of a full-leg cast for 7 days. Muscle biopsies were taken before creatine loading, prior to and immediately after leg immobilization, and after 7 days of subsequent recovery. Quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) (computed tomography [CT] scan) and leg muscle strength (one-repetition maximum [1-RM] knee extension) were assessed before and immediately after immobilization and after 1 week of recovery. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Data are presented consistently as mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM). Results: There was a significant overall increase in muscle total creatine content following the 5-day loading phase (p = 0.049), which appeared driven by an increase in the creatine group (from 90 ± 9 to 107 ± 4 mmol/kg−1 dry muscle) with no apparent change in the placebo group (from 88 ± 4 to 90 ± 3 mmol/kg−1; p = 0.066 for time × treatment interaction). Quadriceps muscle CSA had declined by 465 ± 59 and 425 ± 69 mm2 (p <0.01) in the creatine and placebo group, respectively, with no differences between groups (p = 0.76). Leg muscle strength decreased from 56 ± 4 to 53 ± 4 kg in the creatine and from 59 ± 3 to 53 ± 3 kg in the placebo group, with no differences between groups (p = 0.20). Muscle fiber size did not change significantly over time in either group (p > 0.05). When non-responders to creatine loading were excluded (n = 6), responders (n = 8; total creatine content increasing from 70 to 106 mmol/kg−1) showed similar findings, with no signs of preservation of muscle mass or strength during immobilization. During the subsequent recovery phase, no differences in muscle mass or strength were found between the two groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Creatine supplementation prior to and during leg immobilization does not prevent or attenuate the loss of muscle mass or strength during short-term muscle disuse.

    Sex-specific responses to territorial intrusions in a communication network : Evidence from radio-tagged great tits
    Snijders, Lysanne ; Oers, Kees van; Naguib, Marc - \ 2017
    Ecology and Evolution 7 (2017)3. - ISSN 2045-7758 - p. 918 - 927.
    Communication network - Eavesdropping - Great tits - Long-range signaling - Sexual selection - Social information
    Signals play a key role in the ecology and evolution of animal populations, influencing processes such as sexual selection and conflict resolution. In many species, sexually selected signals have a dual function: attracting mates and repelling rivals. Yet, to what extent males and females under natural conditions differentially respond to such signals remains poorly understood, due to a lack of field studies that simultaneously track both sexes. Using a novel spatial tracking system, we tested whether or not the spatial behavior of male and female great tits (Parus major) changes in relation to the vocal response of a territorial male neighbor to an intruder. We tracked the spatial behavior of male and female great tits (N = 44), 1 hr before and 1 hr after simulating territory intrusions, employing automatized Encounternet radio-tracking technology. We recorded the spatial and vocal response of the challenged males and quantified attraction and repulsion of neighboring males and females to the intrusion site. We additionally quantified the direct proximity network of the challenged male. The strength of a male's vocal response to an intruder induced sex-dependent movements in the neighborhood, via female attraction and male repulsion. Stronger vocal responders were older and in better body condition. The proximity networks of the male vocal responders, including the number of sex-dependent connections and average time spent with connections, however, did not change directly following the intrusion. The effects on neighbor movements suggest that the strength of a male's vocal response can provide relevant social information to both the males and the females in the neighborhood, resulting in both sexes adjusting their spatial behavior in contrasting ways, while the social proximity network remained stable. This study underlines the importance of "silent" eavesdroppers within communication networks for studying the dual functioning and evolution of sexually selected signals.
    Data from: Dominance rank and boldness predict social attraction in great tits
    Snijders, L. ; Naguib, M. ; Oers, Kees van - \ 2016
    boldness - dominance - exploration - great tits - video playback - social attraction
    Social relationships can have important fitness consequences, and how well an individual is socially connected often correlates with other behavioral traits. Whether such correlations are caused by underlying individual differences in social attraction usually remains unclear, because to identify effects of individual traits on social attraction, it is essential to experimentally exclude the influence of the social partner. Using standardized high-definition video playback on captive great tits (Parus major), we effectively demonstrate the influence of individual traits on the motivation to be near a conspecific. We show that social attraction varied contrastingly with boldness and stimulus novelty. Shyer birds tended to show stronger social attraction when they were confronted with the stimulus bird for the first time. Lower ranked birds showed the overall strongest social attraction. This rank effect remained after experimentally changing dominance ranks by altering group compositions. Moreover, preference for social association tended to increase with a decrease in dominance rank, suggesting that birds plastically change their social preference in relation to their within-group dominance status. Our results provide insight into how social relations can form and change, processes that are key for understanding the long-term consequences of the social environment, and the role individuals might play in influencing this environment themselves.
    Data from: Context-dependent effects of radio transmitter attachment on a small passerine
    Snijders, L. ; Nieuwe Weme, L.E. ; Goede, Piet de; Savage, J.L. ; Oers, Kees van; Naguib, M. - \ 2016
    Wageningen University & Research
    biotelemetry - passerine - reproduction - Parus major
    Biotelemetry devices provide unprecedented insights into the spatial behaviour and ecology of many animals. Quantifying the potential effects of attaching such devices to animals is essential, but certain effects may appear only in specific or particularly stressful contexts. Here we analyse the effects of radio transmitter attachment on great tits Parus major tagged over three environmentally dissimilar years, as part of a project studying social- and communication networks. When we radio-tagged birds before breeding, only those tagged in the coldest spring tended to be less likely to breed than control birds. Breeding probability was independent of relative transmitter weight (between 5 and 8% bodyweight). When we radio-tagged both parents during nestling provisioning (transmitter weight between 6 and 8%), tagged parents were more likely than control parents to desert their brood in two out of three years, while in the other year no tagged parents deserted. Tagged parents provisioning larger broods were most likely to desert, especially during lower average temperatures. Video analyses did not reveal any transmitter effects on provisioning behaviour of parents in the year with no desertion. We conclude that radio tagging before breeding did not lead to negative effects, regardless of transmitter weight, but that decisions about radio-tagging both parents during nestling provisioning need to be made with exceptional care, taking both environmental context and transmitter weight into account. Reporting results from long-term radio-tracking studies comprising several environmentally variable years is crucial to understand and predict potential transmitter effects and maximise the tremendous potential of biotelemetry.
    Tracking the social behaviour of a small songbird
    Snijders, Lysanne - \ 2016
    To tweet or not to tweet: Tracking the social networks of a smaal songbird
    Snijders, Lysanne - \ 2016
    Tracking the social behaviour of a small songbird
    Snijders, L. ; Oers, K. van; Naguib, M. - \ 2016
    In: Book of abstracts of the 16th congress of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology. - Exeter, United Kingdom : University of Exeter - p. 87 - 87.
    Tracking the social behaviour of a small songbird. Using Encounternet we studied the social dynamics of territorial great tits (Parus major) and revealed that slower exploring males have less-central social network positions. Additionally, by tracking both males and females, we tested if their spatial behaviour and social dynamics change after a perturbation in the communication network. We reveal that neighbouring males and neighbouring females respond in a contrasting way to territory intrusions, depending on the vocal response of the intruded male. This is one of the few projects to also track female movements in response to such an intrusion. Hence, novel technologies facilitate the understanding of how individuals may shape their own social environment.
    Introduction to Animal Behaviour
    Savage, J.L. ; Snijders, L. ; Naguib, M. - \ 2016
    Wageningen, The Netherlands : edX
    animal welfare - wild animals - animal behaviour - dierenwelzijn - wilde dieren - diergedrag
    Massive Open Online Course
    Accounting for multimorbidity can affect the estimation of the Burden of Disease : A comparison of approaches
    Hilderink, Henk B.M. ; Plasmans, Marjanne H.D. ; Snijders, Bianca E.P. ; Boshuizen, Hendriek C. ; René Poos, M.J.J.C. ; Gool, Coen H. van - \ 2016
    Archives of Public Health 74 (2016). - ISSN 0778-7367 - 16 p.
    Disability weights - Disease burden - Multimorbidity - Prevalence

    Background: Various Burden of Disease (BoD) studies do not account for multimorbidity in their BoD estimates. Ignoring multimorbidity can lead to inaccuracies in BoD estimations, particularly in ageing populations that include large proportions of persons with two or more health conditions. The objective of this study is to improve BoD estimates for the Netherlands by accounting for multimorbidity. For this purpose, we analyzed different methods for 1) estimating the prevalence of multimorbidity and 2) deriving Disability Weights (DWs) for multimorbidity by using existing data on single health conditions. Methods: We included 25 health conditions from the Dutch Burden of Disease study that have a high rate of prevalence and that make a large contribution to the total number of Years Lived with a Disability (YLD). First, we analyzed four methods for estimating the prevalence of multimorbid conditions (i.e. independent, independent age-and sex-specific, dependent, and dependent sex-and age-specific). Secondly, we analyzed three methods for calculating the Combined Disability Weights (CDWs) associated with multimorbid conditions (i.e. additive, multiplicative and maximum limit). A combination of these two approaches was used to recalculate the number of YLDs, which is a component of the Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALY). Results: This study shows that the YLD estimates for 25 health conditions calculated using the multiplicative method for Combined Disability Weights are 5 % lower, and 14 % lower when using the maximum limit method, than when calculated using the additive method. Adjusting for sex-and age-specific dependent co-occurrence of health conditions reduces the number of YLDs by 10 % for the multiplicative method and by 26 % for the maximum limit method. The adjustment is higher for health conditions with a higher prevalence in old age, like heart failure (up to 43 %) and coronary heart diseases (up to 33 %). Health conditions with a high prevalence in middle age, such as anxiety disorders, have a moderate adjustment (up to 13 %). Conclusions: We conclude that BoD calculations that do not account for multimorbidity can result in an overestimation of the actual BoD. This may affect public health policy strategies that focus on single health conditions if the underlying cost-effectiveness analysis overestimates the intended effects. The methodology used in this study could be further refined to provide greater insight into co-occurrence and the possible consequences of multimorbid conditions in terms of disability for particular combinations of health conditions.

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