Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

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    The role of mitochondria in SAMS
    Allard, Neeltje ; Timmers, Silvie - \ 2020
    In: Statin-Associated Muscle Symptoms / Thompson, P.D., Taylor, B.A., Springer - ISBN 9783030333034 - p. 105 - 112.
    In this chapter we summarize the evidence for a central role of mitochondrial dysfunction in statin-associated muscle symptoms. Statin-related mitochondrial dysfunction can manifest itself in skeletal muscle by inducing a plethora of architectural and biochemical adaptations. Structural changes seen in biopsy specimens, including red ragged fibers, cytochrome oxidase-negative myofibers, and lipid-loaded vacuoles, are signs of mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction. Disturbances in mitochondrial energy metabolism are shown through increased lactate/pyruvate ratios, disruption of beta-oxidation, a decrease in mitochondrial DNA, and disturbances in electron transport chain complex activities. Apoptosis of myofibers may occur as a result of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and the formation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore the role of coenzyme Q10 deficiency and disturbances in calcium homeostasis in relation to statin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction will be discussed.
    FEMA GRAS assessment of natural flavor complexes: Clove, cinnamon leaf and West Indian bay leaf-derived flavoring ingredients
    Gooderham, Nigel J. ; Cohen, Samuel M. ; Eisenbrand, Gerhard ; Fukushima, Shoji ; Guengerich, F.P. ; Hecht, Stephen S. ; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M. ; Rosol, Thomas J. ; Davidsen, Jeanne M. ; Harman, Christie L. ; Murray, Ian J. ; Taylor, Sean V. - \ 2020
    Food and Chemical Toxicology 145 (2020). - ISSN 0278-6915
    Cinnamon leaf oil - Clove essential oils, extract and oleoresin - GRAS - Natural flavor complex - Safety evaluation - West Indian bay leaf oil and oleoresin

    In 2015, the Expert Panel of the Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association initiated the safety re-evaluation of over 250 natural flavor complexes (NFCs) used as flavor ingredients. This publication, 4th in a series focusing on the safety evaluation of NFCs, presents an evaluation of NFCs rich in hydroxyallylbenzene and hydroxypropenylbenzene constituents using a procedure initially published in 2005 and updated in 2018 that evaluates the safety of naturally occurring mixtures for their intended use as flavoring ingredients. The procedure requires the characterization of the chemical composition for each NFC and subsequent organization of the constituents into defined congeneric groups. The safety of each NFC is evaluated using the conservative threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) approach together with studies on absorption, metabolism and toxicology of the NFC and its constituent congeneric groups. By the application of this procedure, seven NFCs, derived from clove, cinnamon leaf and West Indian bay leaf were affirmed as “generally recognized as safe (GRAS)” under their conditions of intended use as flavor ingredients. An eighth NFC, an oleoresin of West Indian bay leaf, was affirmed based on its estimated intake, which is below the TTC of 0.15 μg/person per day for compounds with structural alerts for genotoxicity.

    Author Correction: Global status and conservation potential of reef sharks
    MacNeil, M.A. ; Chapman, Demian D. ; Heupel, Michelle ; Simpfendorfer, Colin A. ; Heithaus, Michael ; Meekan, Mark ; Harvey, Euan ; Goetze, Jordan ; Kiszka, Jeremy ; Bond, Mark E. ; Currey-Randall, Leanne M. ; Speed, Conrad W. ; Sherman, C.S. ; Rees, Matthew J. ; Udyawer, Vinay ; Flowers, Kathryn I. ; Clementi, Gina ; Valentin-Albanese, Jasmine ; Gorham, Taylor ; Adam, M.S. ; Ali, Khadeeja ; Pina-Amargós, Fabián ; Angulo-Valdés, Jorge A. ; Asher, Jacob ; Barcia, Laura García ; Beaufort, Océane ; Benjamin, Cecilie ; Bernard, Anthony T.F. ; Berumen, Michael L. ; Bierwagen, Stacy ; Bonnema, Erika ; Bown, Rosalind M.K. ; Bradley, Darcy ; Brooks, Edd ; Brown, J.J. ; Buddo, Dayne ; Burke, Patrick ; Cáceres, Camila ; Cardeñosa, Diego ; Carrier, Jeffrey C. ; Caselle, Jennifer E. ; Charloo, Venkatesh ; Claverie, Thomas ; Clua, Eric ; Cochran, Jesse E.M. ; Cook, Neil ; Cramp, Jessica ; D’Alberto, Brooke ; Graaf, Martin de; Dornhege, Mareike ; Estep, Andy ; Fanovich, Lanya ; Farabaugh, Naomi F. ; Fernando, Daniel ; Flam, Anna L. ; Floros, Camilla ; Fourqurean, Virginia ; Garla, Ricardo ; Gastrich, Kirk ; George, Lachlan ; Graham, Rory ; Guttridge, Tristan ; Hardenstine, Royale S. ; Heck, Stephen ; Henderson, Aaron C. ; Hertler, Heidi ; Hueter, Robert ; Johnson, Mohini ; Jupiter, Stacy ; Kasana, Devanshi ; Kessel, Steven T. ; Kiilu, Benedict ; Kirata, Taratu ; Kuguru, Baraka ; Kyne, Fabian ; Langlois, Tim ; Lédée, Elodie J.I. ; Lindfield, Steve ; Luna-Acosta, Andrea ; Maggs, Jade ; Manjaji-Matsumoto, B.M. ; Marshall, Andrea ; Matich, Philip ; McCombs, Erin ; McLean, Dianne ; Meggs, Llewelyn ; Moore, Stephen ; Mukherji, Sushmita ; Murray, Ryan ; Kaimuddin, Muslimin ; Newman, Stephen J. ; Nogués, Josep ; Obota, Clay ; O’Shea, Owen ; Osuka, Kennedy ; Papastamatiou, Yannis P. ; Perera, Nishan ; Peterson, Bradley ; Ponzo, Alessandro ; Prasetyo, Andhika ; Sjamsul Quamar, L.M. ; Quinlan, Jessica ; Ruiz-Abierno, Alexei ; Sala, Enric ; Samoilys, Melita ; Schärer-Umpierre, Michelle ; Schlaff, Audrey ; Simpson, Nikola ; Smith, Adam N.H. ; Sparks, Lauren ; Tanna, Akshay ; Torres, Rubén ; Travers, Michael J. ; Zinnicq Bergmann, Maurits van; Vigliola, Laurent ; Ward, Juney ; Watts, Alexandra M. ; Wen, Colin ; Whitman, Elizabeth ; Wirsing, Aaron J. ; Wothke, Aljoscha ; Zarza-Gonzâlez, Esteban ; Cinner, Joshua E. - \ 2020
    Nature (2020). - ISSN 0028-0836

    An Amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.

    Regenerating food systems : A social-ecological approach
    Duncan, J.A.B. ; Carolan, Michael ; Wiskerke, J.S.C. - \ 2020
    In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainable and Regenerative Food Systems / Duncan, Jessica, Carolan, Michael, Wiskerke, Johannes S.C., Routledge Taylor & Francis Group - ISBN 9781138608047 - p. 1 - 11.
    The future of food is uncertain. We are facing an overwhelming number of interconnected and complex challenges related to the ways we grow, distribute, access, eat, and dispose of food. Yet, there are stories of hope and opportunities for radical transition towards food systems that enhance the ability of living things to co-evolve. In this chapter we summarize the rationale for this Handbook on Sustainable and Regenerative Food Systems and reflect on the value and contribution of regenerative approaches to achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. We them propose six principles for regenerative food systems that build on the diverse contributions that make up this book: acknowledging and including diverse forms of knowing and being; taking care of people, animals and the planet; moving beyond capitalist approaches; commoning the food system; promoting accountable innovations; and long-term planning and rural–urban relations. We conclude by reflecting on the value of regenerative food systems as a concept and practice, proposing it has the potential to move us beyond the boundaries of sustainability. Regenerative approaches take into account not only farming systems, but also farm families, rural communities, landscapes, and regions and ecosystems. They are key to our collective food futures.
    Routledge Handbook of Sustainable and Regenerative Food Systems
    Duncan, J.A.B. ; Carolan, Michael ; Wiskerke, J.S.C. - \ 2020
    Routledge Taylor & Francis Group - ISBN 9781138608047 - 478 p.
    This handbook includes contributions from established and emerging scholars from around the world and draws on multiple approaches and subjects to explore the socio-economic, cultural, ecological, institutional, legal, and policy aspects of regenerative food practices.
    The future of food is uncertain. We are facing an overwhelming number of interconnected and complex challenges related to the ways we grow, distribute, access, eat, and dispose of food. Yet, there are stories of hope and opportunities for radical change towards food systems that enhance the ability of living things to co-evolve. Given this, activities and imaginaries looking to improve, rather than just sustain, communities and ecosystems are needed, as are fresh perspectives and new terminology. The Routledge Handbook of Sustainable and Regenerative Food Systems addresses this need. The chapters cover diverse practices, geographies, scales, and entry-points. They focus not only on the core requirements to deliver sustainable agriculture and food supply, but go beyond this to think about how these can also actively participate with social-ecological systems. The book is presented in an accessible way, with reflection questions meant to spark discussion and debate on how to transition to safe, just, and healthy food systems. Taken together, the chapters in this handbook highlight the consequences of current food practices and showcase the multiple ways that people are doing food differently.
    Experimental–numerical method for calculating bending moments in swimming fish shows that fish larvae control undulatory swimming with simple actuation
    Voesenek, Cees J. ; Li, Gen ; Muijres, Florian T. ; Leeuwen, Johan L. Van; Taylor, Graham K. - \ 2020
    PloS Biology 18 (2020)7. - ISSN 1545-7885 - p. e3000462 - e3000462.
    Most fish swim with body undulations that result from fluid–structure interactions between the fish’s internal tissues and the surrounding water. Gaining insight into these complex fluid–structure interactions is essential to understand how fish swim. To this end, we developed a dedicated experimental–numerical inverse dynamics approach to calculate the lateral bending moment distributions for a large-amplitude undulatory swimmer that moves freely in three-dimensional space. We combined automated motion tracking from multiple synchronised high-speed video sequences, computation of fluid dynamic stresses on the swimmer’s body from computational fluid dynamics, and bending moment calculations using these stresses as input for a novel beam model of the body. The bending moment, which represent the system’s net actuation, varies over time and along the fish’s central axis due to muscle actions, passive tissues, inertia, and fluid dynamics. Our three-dimensional analysis of 113 swimming events of zebrafish larvae ranging in age from 3 to 12 days after fertilisation shows that these bending moment patterns are not only relatively simple but also strikingly similar throughout early development and from fast starts to periodic swimming. This suggests that fish larvae may produce and adjust swimming movements relatively simply, yet effectively, while restructuring their neuromuscular control system throughout their rapid development.
    Caring agricultural and food practices
    Hassink, J. ; Moriggi, Angela ; Senni, Saverio ; Hense, Elisabeth ; Moor, Dries de - \ 2020
    In: Routledge Handbook of sustainable and regenerative food systems / Duncan, Jessica, Carolan, Michael, Wiskerke, Johannes S.C., Routledge Taylor & Francis Group - ISBN 9781138608047 - p. 126 - 140.
    We explore and analyse caring regenerative agricultural practices using care ethics as a valuable tool. We define care as the ability to being responsible for, attending to, being concerned for or about, and paying watchful attention to the object of care. Following Tronto, caring includes everything we do to maintain, continue, and repair our world so that we can live in it, looking for the needs not only of ourselves but also of our environment. We focus on potentially promising caring practices like community supported agriculture, urban agriculture, care and social farming, and organic and biological-dynamic farming. The empirical cases in the Netherlands and Italy described are guided by social justice, cooperation, respectful relationships, inclusion, and education. We describe how care for the community, vulnerable citizens, the environment, farm animals, and food is practised. Challenges farmers are facing are related to access to land, budgets, and dealing with the conventional system. An important question is to what extent these caring practices can influence the dominant agricultural and food systems and help to stimulate the transition towards regenerative agricultural and food practices.
    Climate Change and European Fisheries and Aquaculture: CERES Project Synthesis Report
    Peck, Myron A. ; Catalán, Ignacio A. ; Damalas, D. ; Elliot, M. ; Ferreira, J.G. ; Hamon, K.G. ; Kamermans, P. ; Kay, S. ; Kreiss, C.M. ; Pinnegar, J.K. ; Sailley, Sévrine ; Taylor, N.G.H. - \ 2020
    Hamburg : University of Hamburg - 110 p.
    Global status and conservation potential of reef sharks
    MacNeil, Aaron ; Chapman, Demian D. ; Heupel, Michelle ; Simpfendorfer, Colin A. ; Heithaus, Michael ; Meekan, Mark ; Harvey, Euan ; Goetze, Jordan ; Kiszka, Jeremy ; Bond, Mark E. ; Currey-Randall, Leanne M. ; Speed, Conrad W. ; Sherman, Samantha ; Rees, Matthew J. ; Udyawer, Vinay ; Flowers, Kathryn I. ; Clementi, Gina ; Valentin-Albanese, Jasmine ; Gorham, Taylor ; Adam, Shiham ; Khadeeja, Ali ; Pina-Amargós, Fabián ; Angulo-Valdés, Jorge A. ; Asher, Jacob ; García Barcia, Laura ; Beaufort, Océane ; Benjamin, Cecilie ; Bernard, Anthony T.F. ; Berumen, Michael L. ; Bierwagen, Stacy ; Bonnema, Erika ; Bown, Rosalind M.K. ; Bradley, Darcey ; Brooks, Edd ; Brown, Jed ; Buddo, Dayne ; Burke, Patrick ; Cáceres, Camila ; Cardeñosa, Diego ; Carrier, Jeffrey C. ; Caselle, Jennifer E. ; Charloo, Venkatesh ; Claverie, Thomas ; Clua, Eric ; Cochran, Jesse E.M. ; Cook, Neil ; Cramp, Jessica ; D’Alberto, Brooke ; Graaf, Martin de; Dornhege, Mareike ; Estep, Andy ; Fanovich, Lanya ; Farabough, Naomi F. ; Fernando, Daniel ; Flam, Anna L. ; Floros, Camilla ; Fourqurean, Virginia ; Garla, Ricardo ; Gastrich, Kirk ; George, Lachlan ; Graham, Rory ; Guttridge, Tristan ; Hardenstine, Royale S. ; Heck, Stephen ; Henderson, Aaron C. ; Hertler, Heidi ; Hueter, Robert ; Johnson, Mohini ; Jupiter, Stacy ; Kasana, Devanshi ; Kessel, Steven T. ; Kiilu, Benedict ; Kirata, Taratu ; Kuguru, Baraka ; Kyne, Fabian ; Langlois, Tim ; Lédée, Elodie J.I. ; Lindfield, Steve ; Luna-Acosta, Andrea ; Maggs, Jade ; Manjaji-Matsumoto, Mabel ; Marshall, Andrea ; Matich, Philip ; McCombs, Erin ; McLean, Dianne ; Meggs, Llewelyn ; Moore, Stephen ; Mukherji, Sushmita ; Murray, Ryan ; Kaimuddin, Muslimin ; Newman, Stephen J. ; Nogués, Josep ; Obota, Clay ; O’Shea, Owen ; Osuka, Kennedy ; Papastamatiou, Yannis P. ; Perera, Nishan ; Peterson, Bradley ; Ponzo, Alessandro ; Prasetyo, Andhika ; Quamar, Sjamsul ; Quinlan, Jessica ; Ruiz-Abierno, Alexei ; Sala, Enric ; Samoilys, Melita ; Schärer-Umpierre, Michelle ; Schlaff, Audrey ; Simpson, Nikola ; Smith, Adam N.H. ; Sparks, Lauren ; Tanna, Akshay ; Torres, Rubén ; Travers, Michael J. ; Zinnicq Bergmann, Maurits van; Vigliola, Laurent ; Ward, Juney ; Watts, Alexandra M. ; Wen, Colin ; Whitman, Elizabeth ; Wirsing, Aaron J. ; Wothke, Aljoscha ; Zarza-Gonzâlez, Esteban ; Cinner, Joshua E. - \ 2020
    Nature 583 (2020). - ISSN 0028-0836 - p. 801 - 806.

    Decades of overexploitation have devastated shark populations, leaving considerable doubt as to their ecological status1,2. Yet much of what is known about sharks has been inferred from catch records in industrial fisheries, whereas far less information is available about sharks that live in coastal habitats3. Here we address this knowledge gap using data from more than 15,000 standardized baited remote underwater video stations that were deployed on 371 reefs in 58 nations to estimate the conservation status of reef sharks globally. Our results reveal the profound impact that fishing has had on reef shark populations: we observed no sharks on almost 20% of the surveyed reefs. Reef sharks were almost completely absent from reefs in several nations, and shark depletion was strongly related to socio-economic conditions such as the size and proximity of the nearest market, poor governance and the density of the human population. However, opportunities for the conservation of reef sharks remain: shark sanctuaries, closed areas, catch limits and an absence of gillnets and longlines were associated with a substantially higher relative abundance of reef sharks. These results reveal several policy pathways for the restoration and management of reef shark populations, from direct top-down management of fishing to indirect improvement of governance conditions. Reef shark populations will only have a high chance of recovery by engaging key socio-economic aspects of tropical fisheries.

    Slow adventure: from natural concept to consumer desire
    Varley, P. ; Huijbens, Edward ; Taylor, S. ; Laven, D. - \ 2020
    Sundsvall : ETOUR / Mid-Sweden University (ETOUR Rapport 2020:2) - 20 p.
    The emergent theme of slow adventure suggests potential for a more sustainable form of tourism in sparsely populated and remote areas. However, research into viable consumer markets, mind-sets and ideologies, and ways to address them, has been lacking to date. This lacuna is addressed with results from a three-year European research project. First, the slow adventure concept’s applicability for peripheral areas is interrogated; second, present consumer trend and media analysis research is discussed, linking nature and mediated, shared outdoor living experiences to emergent contemporary consumption practice. Finally, the potential for marketing outdoor experience packages is considered, as is the appeal to contemporary consumer dreams: escape, communitas, shared learning, and simplicity.
    Tropical Wetlands - Innovation in Mapping and Management
    Sulaeman, Yiyi ; Poggio, Laura ; Minasny, Budiman ; Nursyamsi, Dedi - \ 2020
    London : CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group - ISBN 9780367209643 - 210 p.
    This book contains papers presented at the International Workshop on Tropical Wetlands, held in Banjarmasin, Indonesia. This workshop discussed wetland mapping and characterization as well as wetland management for sustainable agriculture. This volume contains selected papers on tropical wetlands, more specifically, peatland, tidal land, and acid sulphate soils.

    This book presents an international overview of wetland and peatland mapping experiences from Indonesia, Congo, Brazil, Australia, and Scotland. Several innovative techniques are discussed, including integrated digital soil mapping and remote sensing techniques, as well as geodatabase processing and field surveying. This book further discussed tropical wetland management for agriculture as practiced in Indonesia, Vietnam, and Thailand.
    Dataset for the model of a municipality competitiveness in relation to the geothermal resources exploitation in Poland
    Kurek, Katarzyna A. ; Heijman, Wim ; Ophem, Johan van; Gędek, Stanisław ; Strojny, Jacek - \ 2020
    Data in Brief 31 (2020). - ISSN 2352-3409
    Analytical Hierarchy Process - Geothermal energy - Local competitiveness - Multicriteria decision analysis - Socioeconomic indicators

    This dataset corresponds with the manuscript “The impact of geothermal resources on the competitiveness of municipalities: evidence from Poland” [1]. In the paper, the geothermal resources are assumed as a local competitive advantage for the municipalities that exploit them. In order to examine the relation between the exploitation of the geothermal resources and local competitiveness we determine a model of municipality competitiveness in Poland. Concept of the local competitiveness is referred to place-based measures (Lovering [2], Mytelka and Farinelli [3], Plummer and Taylor [4], Kitson et al. [5]) and it is related to the management of local resources (Malecki [6], Turok [7]). Literature review suggests that the local competitiveness is best reflected in the indicators of economic welfare and sustainability (Meyer-Stamer [8], Audretsch et al. [9]). Therefore, we use an expert method to build the model of a municipality competitiveness indicators on the example of Poland. Throughout the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) method engaged experts select the 24 indicators of local competitiveness. This method serves in situations of a problem complexity (Kamenetzky [10], Saaty [11]) and as a multicriteria method in the regional studies (Dinc et al. [12]). Aggregation of the AHP selected indicators yields a synthetic competitiveness index for each of the municipalities that we examine. This index constitutes the model dependent variable in the related research article. This procedure of building municipality competitiveness model sets an example of approaching a complex phenomenon such as the local competitiveness definition. The versatility of this method enables its application into related research cases.

    Community factors affecting participation in larval source management for malaria control in Chikwawa District, Southern Malawi
    Gowelo, Steven ; McCann, Robert S. ; Koenraadt, Constantianus J.M. ; Takken, Willem ; Berg, Henk van den; Manda-Taylor, Lucinda - \ 2020
    Malaria Journal 19 (2020)1. - ISSN 1475-2875 - 1 p.
    Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis - Community - Larval source management - Malaria - Malawi

    BACKGROUND: To further reduce malaria, larval source management (LSM) is proposed as a complementary strategy to the existing strategies. LSM has potential to control insecticide resistant, outdoor biting and outdoor resting vectors. Concerns about costs and operational feasibility of implementation of LSM at large scale are among the reasons the strategy is not utilized in many African countries. Involving communities in LSM could increase intervention coverage, reduce costs of implementation and improve sustainability of operations. Community acceptance and participation in community-led LSM depends on a number of factors. These factors were explored under the Majete Malaria Project in Chikwawa district, southern Malawi. METHODS: Separate focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with members from the general community (n = 3); health animators (HAs) (n = 3); and LSM committee members (n = 3). In-depth interviews (IDIs) were conducted with community members. Framework analysis was employed to determine the factors contributing to community acceptance and participation in the locally-driven intervention. RESULTS: Nine FGDs and 24 IDIs were held, involving 87 members of the community. Widespread knowledge of malaria as a health problem, its mode of transmission, mosquito larval habitats and mosquito control was recorded. High awareness of an association between creation of larval habitats and malaria transmission was reported. Perception of LSM as a tool for malaria control was high. The use of a microbial larvicide as a form of LSM was perceived as both safe and effective. However, actual participation in LSM by the different interviewee groups varied. Labour-intensiveness and time requirements of the LSM activities, lack of financial incentives, and concern about health risks when wading in water bodies contributed to lower participation. CONCLUSION: Community involvement in LSM increased local awareness of malaria as a health problem, its risk factors and control strategies. However, community participation varied among the respondent groups, with labour and time demands of the activities, and lack of incentives, contributing to reduced participation. Innovative tools that can reduce the labour and time demands could improve community participation in the activities. Further studies are required to investigate the forms and modes of delivery of incentives in operational community-driven LSM interventions.

    Long-term thermal sensitivity of Earth's tropical forests
    Sullivan, Martin J.P. ; Lewis, Simon L. ; Affum-Baffoe, Kofi ; Castilho, Carolina ; Costa, Flávia ; Sanchez, Aida Cuni ; Ewango, Corneille E.N. ; Hubau, Wannes ; Marimon, Beatriz ; Monteagudo-Mendoza, Abel ; Qie, Lan ; Sonké, Bonaventure ; Martinez, Rodolfo Vasquez ; Baker, Timothy R. ; Brienen, Roel J.W. ; Feldpausch, Ted R. ; Galbraith, David ; Gloor, Manuel ; Malhi, Yadvinder ; Aiba, Shin Ichiro ; Alexiades, Miguel N. ; Almeida, Everton C. ; Oliveira, Edmar Almeida de; Dávila, Esteban Álvarez ; Loayza, Patricia Alvarez ; Andrade, Ana ; Vieira, Simone Aparecida ; Aragão, Luiz E.O.C. ; Araujo-Murakami, Alejandro ; Arets, Eric J.M.M. ; Arroyo, Luzmila ; Ashton, Peter ; Aymard C, Gerardo ; Baccaro, Fabrício B. ; Banin, Lindsay F. ; Baraloto, Christopher ; Camargo, Plínio Barbosa ; Barlow, Jos ; Barroso, Jorcely ; Bastin, Jean François ; Batterman, Sarah A. ; Beeckman, Hans ; Begne, Serge K. ; Bennett, Amy C. ; Berenguer, Erika ; Berry, Nicholas ; Blanc, Lilian ; Boeckx, Pascal ; Bogaert, Jan ; Bonal, Damien ; Bongers, Frans ; Bradford, Matt ; Brearley, Francis Q. ; Brncic, Terry ; Brown, Foster ; Burban, Benoit ; Camargo, José Luís ; Castro, Wendeson ; Céron, Carlos ; Ribeiro, Sabina Cerruto ; Moscoso, Victor Chama ; Chave, Jerôme ; Chezeaux, Eric ; Clark, Connie J. ; Souza, Fernanda Coelho de; Collins, Murray ; Comiskey, James A. ; Valverde, Fernando Cornejo ; Medina, Massiel Corrales ; Costa, Lola da; Dančák, Martin ; Dargie, Greta C. ; Davies, Stuart ; Cardozo, Nallaret Davila ; Haulleville, Thales de; Medeiros, Marcelo Brilhante de; Aguila Pasquel, Jhon Del; Derroire, Géraldine ; Fiore, Anthony Di; Doucet, Jean Louis ; Dourdain, Aurélie ; Droissant, Vincent ; Duque, Luisa Fernanda ; Ekoungoulou, Romeo ; Elias, Fernando ; Erwin, Terry ; Esquivel-Muelbert, Adriane ; Fauset, Sophie ; Ferreira, Joice ; Llampazo, Gerardo Flores ; Foli, Ernest ; Ford, Andrew ; Gilpin, Martin ; Hall, Jefferson S. ; Hamer, Keith C. ; Hamilton, Alan C. ; Harris, David J. ; Hart, Terese B. ; Hédl, Radim ; Herault, Bruno ; Herrera, Rafael ; Higuchi, Niro ; Hladik, Annette ; Coronado, Eurídice Honorio ; Huamantupa-Chuquimaco, Isau ; Huasco, Walter Huaraca ; Jeffery, Kathryn J. ; Jimenez-Rojas, Eliana ; Kalamandeen, Michelle ; Djuikouo, Marie Noël Kamdem ; Kearsley, Elizabeth ; Umetsu, Ricardo Keichi ; Kho, Lip Khoon ; Killeen, Timothy ; Kitayama, Kanehiro ; Klitgaard, Bente ; Koch, Alexander ; Labrière, Nicolas ; Laurance, William ; Laurance, Susan ; Leal, Miguel E. ; Levesley, Aurora ; Lima, Adriano J.N. ; Lisingo, Janvier ; Lopes, Aline P. ; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela ; Lovejoy, Tom ; Lovett, Jon C. ; Lowe, Richard ; Magnusson, William E. ; Malumbres-Olarte, Jagoba ; Manzatto, Ângelo Gilberto ; Marimon, Ben Hur ; Marshall, Andrew R. ; Marthews, Toby ; Almeida Reis, Simone Matias de; Maycock, Colin ; Melgaço, Karina ; Mendoza, Casimiro ; Metali, Faizah ; Mihindou, Vianet ; Milliken, William ; Mitchard, Edward T.A. ; Morandi, Paulo S. ; Mossman, Hannah L. ; Nagy, Laszlo ; Nascimento, Henrique ; Neill, David ; Nilus, Reuben ; Vargas, Percy Núñez ; Palacios, Walter ; Camacho, Nadir Pallqui ; Peacock, Julie ; Pendry, Colin ; Peñuela Mora, Maria Cristina ; Pickavance, Georgia C. ; Pipoly, John ; Pitman, Nigel ; Playfair, Maureen ; Poorter, Lourens ; Poulsen, John R. ; Poulsen, Axel Dalberg ; Preziosi, Richard ; Prieto, Adriana ; Primack, Richard B. ; Ramírez-Angulo, Hirma ; Reitsma, Jan ; Réjou-Méchain, Maxime ; Correa, Zorayda Restrepo ; Sousa, Thaiane Rodrigues de; Bayona, Lily Rodriguez ; Roopsind, Anand ; Rudas, Agustín ; Rutishauser, Ervan ; Abu Salim, Kamariah ; Salomão, Rafael P. ; Schietti, Juliana ; Sheil, Douglas ; Silva, Richarlly C. ; Espejo, Javier Silva ; Valeria, Camila Silva ; Silveira, Marcos ; Simo-Droissart, Murielle ; Simon, Marcelo Fragomeni ; Singh, James ; Soto Shareva, Yahn Carlos ; Stahl, Clement ; Stropp, Juliana ; Sukri, Rahayu ; Sunderland, Terry ; Svátek, Martin ; Swaine, Michael D. ; Swamy, Varun ; Taedoumg, Hermann ; Talbot, Joey ; Taplin, James ; Taylor, David ; Steege, Hans Ter; Terborgh, John ; Thomas, Raquel ; Thomas, Sean C. ; Torres-Lezama, Armando ; Umunay, Peter ; Gamarra, Luis Valenzuela ; Heijden, Geertje van der; Hout, Peter van der; Meer, Peter van der; Nieuwstadt, Mark van; Verbeeck, Hans ; Vernimmen, Ronald ; Vicentini, Alberto ; Vieira, Ima Célia Guimarães ; Torre, Emilio Vilanova ; Vleminckx, Jason ; Vos, Vincent ; Wang, Ophelia ; White, Lee J.T. ; Willcock, Simon ; Woods, John T. ; Wortel, Verginia ; Young, Kenneth ; Zagt, Roderick ; Zemagho, Lise ; Zuidema, Pieter A. ; Zwerts, Joeri A. ; Phillips, Oliver L. - \ 2020
    Science 368 (2020)6493. - ISSN 0036-8075 - p. 869 - 874.

    The sensitivity of tropical forest carbon to climate is a key uncertainty in predicting global climate change. Although short-term drying and warming are known to affect forests, it is unknown if such effects translate into long-term responses. Here, we analyze 590 permanent plots measured across the tropics to derive the equilibrium climate controls on forest carbon. Maximum temperature is the most important predictor of aboveground biomass (-9.1 megagrams of carbon per hectare per degree Celsius), primarily by reducing woody productivity, and has a greater impact per °C in the hottest forests (>32.2°C). Our results nevertheless reveal greater thermal resilience than observations of short-term variation imply. To realize the long-term climate adaptation potential of tropical forests requires both protecting them and stabilizing Earth's climate.

    Plot-level rapid screening for photosynthetic parameters using proximal hyperspectral imaging
    Meacham-Hensold, Katherine ; Fu, Peng ; Wu, Jin ; Serbin, Shawn ; Montes, Christopher M. ; Ainsworth, Elizabeth ; Guan, Kaiyu ; Dracup, Evan ; Pederson, Taylor ; Driever, Steven ; Bernacchi, Carl - \ 2020
    Journal of Experimental Botany 71 (2020)7. - ISSN 0022-0957 - p. 2312 - 2328.
    Field phenotyping - food security - hyperspectral imaging - photosynthesis - proximal sensing - spectral reflectance

    Photosynthesis is currently measured using time-laborious and/or destructive methods which slows research and breeding efforts to identify crop germplasm with higher photosynthetic capacities. We present a plot-level screening tool for quantification of photosynthetic parameters and pigment contents that utilizes hyperspectral reflectance from sunlit leaf pixels collected from a plot (∼2 m×2 m) in <1 min. Using field-grown Nicotiana tabacum with genetically altered photosynthetic pathways over two growing seasons (2017 and 2018), we built predictive models for eight photosynthetic parameters and pigment traits. Using partial least squares regression (PLSR) analysis of plot-level sunlit vegetative reflectance pixels from a single visible near infra-red (VNIR) (400-900 nm) hyperspectral camera, we predict maximum carboxylation rate of Rubisco (Vc,max, R2=0.79) maximum electron transport rate in given conditions (J1800, R2=0.59), maximal light-saturated photosynthesis (Pmax, R2=0.54), chlorophyll content (R2=0.87), the Chl a/b ratio (R2=0.63), carbon content (R2=0.47), and nitrogen content (R2=0.49). Model predictions did not improve when using two cameras spanning 400-1800 nm, suggesting a robust, widely applicable and more 'cost-effective' pipeline requiring only a single VNIR camera. The analysis pipeline and methods can be used in any cropping system with modified species-specific PLSR analysis to offer a high-throughput field phenotyping screening for germplasm with improved photosynthetic performance in field trials.

    Designing wildlife-inclusive cities that support human-animal co-existence
    Apfelbeck, Beate ; Snep, Robbert P.H. ; Hauck, Thomas E. ; Ferguson, Joanna ; Holy, Mona ; Jakoby, Christine ; Scott MacIvor, J. ; Schär, Lukas ; Taylor, Morgan ; Weisser, Wolfgang W. - \ 2020
    Landscape and Urban Planning 200 (2020). - ISSN 0169-2046 - 11 p.

    In an urbanizing world there is an increasing priority for making cities nature-inclusive environments. Cities offer places for human-wildlife experiences, and thus for broad societal support of biodiversity conservation. Cities also depend on ecosystem services provided by biodiversity to remain healthy, liveable places. Although biodiversity is frequently addressed in urban green infrastructure plans, it often is not an integral topic in city planning, urban design and housing development. As a result, wildlife-rich urban green is often lacking in those parts of the cities where people live and work. Here, we introduce the concept of ‘wildlife-inclusive urban design’ for the built-up area of cities that integrates animal needs into the urban planning and design process. To identify key features that determine the success of wildlife-inclusive urban design, we evaluated lessons learnt from existing best practices. These were collected during an international workshop with architects, landscape practitioners, ecological consultants, conservationists and urban ecologists. We propose that features of successful wildlife-inclusive urban design projects are: 1) interdisciplinary design teams that involve ecologists early on, 2) consideration of the entire life-cycle of target species, 3) post-occupancy monitoring and evaluation with feedback to communicate best practices, and 4) stakeholder involvement and participatory approaches. We propose how wildlife-inclusive urban design could be included into the different steps of the urban planning cycle. We conclude that following these principles will facilitate incorporation of wildlife-inclusive urban design into urban planning and design and enable urban environments where humans and animals can thrive in the built-up areas.

    Defining urban open space governance and management
    Jansson, Märit ; Vogel, Nina ; Fors, Hanna ; Dempsey, Nicola ; Buijs, A.E. ; Randrup, T.B. - \ 2020
    In: Urban Open Space Governance and Management / Jansson, Märit, Randrup, Thomas B., Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group - ISBN 9780367173036 - 19 p.
    This chapter introduces and defines central terms needed to understand and discuss contemporary urban open space (UOS) governance and management. It discusses how governance and management already are, and can increasingly become, related to each other in practice. It describes theoretical models, including ‘strategic management’ and the ‘combined governance and management model’. It also provides examples illustrating self-governance, open co-governance and closed co-governance, which are useful to the understanding and development of UOS governance and management. Finally, it contextualises the combined approach to governance and management as a way to promote strategic and inclusive development, responding to current crisis and trends, which increase pressure on UOS.
    Institutionalized Ethical Assessments of Animal Experiments
    Bovenkerk, B. ; Poort, Lonneke - \ 2020
    In: The Routledge Handbook of Animal Ethics / Fischer, B., New York : Taylor & Francis - ISBN 9781315105840
    In order to safeguard animal welfare, in many countries, researchers have to apply for a permit to carry out animal experiments, and this application is assessed by an animal experimentation committee. In this chapter, we zoom in on the assessment made by such committees. How do they weigh the justification of the goal of the experiments against the harm to the animals? What sort of moral dilemmas and institutional challenges do they face?
    Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contacts and mitochondrial dynamics by Sel1L-Hrd1 ERAD during thermogenesis
    Zhou, Zhangsen ; Torres, Mauricio ; Sha, Haibo ; Halbrook, Christopher J. ; Bergh, Françoise van den; Reinert, Rachel B. ; Yamada, Tatsuya ; Wang, Siwen ; Luo, Yingying ; Hunter, Allen H. ; Wang, Chunqing ; Sanderson, Thomas H. ; Liu, Meilian ; Taylor, Aaron ; Sesaki, Hiromi ; Lyssiotis, Costas A. ; Wu, Jun ; Kersten, Sander ; Beard, Daniel A. ; Qi, Ling - \ 2020
    Wageningen University
    GSE145895 - PRJNA608688 - Mus musculus
    Organelles such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria interact with each other at specialized domains on the ER known as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs). Here, using three-dimensional high-resolution imaging techniques, we show that the Sel1LHrd1 protein complex, the most conserved branch of ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD), exerts a profound impact on ER-mitochondria contacts and mitochondrial dynamics, at least in part, by regulating the turnover and hence the abundance of the MAM protein sigma receptor 1 (SigmaR1). Sel1L or Hrd1 deficiency in brown adipocytes impairs dynamic interaction between ER and mitochondria, leading to the formation of pleomorphic “megamitochondria” and, in some cases with penetrating ER tubule(s), in response to acute cold challenge. Mice with ERAD deficiency are cold sensitive and exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction in brown adipocytes. Mechanistically, endogenous SigmaR1 is targeted for proteasomal degradation by Sel1L-Hrd1 ERAD, whose accumulation in ERAD-deficient cells leads to mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) oligomerization, thereby linking ERAD to mitochondrial dynamics. Our study identifies Sel1L-Hrd1 ERAD as a critical determinant of ER-mitochondria contacts, thereby regulating mitochondrial dynamics and thermogenesis.
    Endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation regulates mitochondrial dynamics in brown adipocytes
    Zhou, Zhangsen ; Torres, Mauricio ; Sha, Haibo ; Halbrook, Christopher J. ; Bergh, Françoise van den; Reinert, Rachel B. ; Yamada, Tatsuya ; Wang, Siwen ; Luo, Yingying ; Hunter, Allen H. ; Wang, Chunqing ; Sanderson, Thomas H. ; Liu, Meilian ; Taylor, Aaron ; Sesaki, Hiromi ; Lyssiotis, Costas A. ; Wu, Jun ; Kersten, Sander ; Beard, Daniel A. ; Qi, Ling - \ 2020
    Science 368 (2020)6486. - ISSN 0036-8075 - p. 54 - 60.

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) engages mitochondria at specialized ER domains known as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs). Here, we used three-dimensional high-resolution imaging to investigate the formation of pleomorphic “megamitochondria” with altered MAMs in brown adipocytes lacking the Sel1L-Hrd1 protein complex of ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD). Mice with ERAD deficiency in brown adipocytes were cold sensitive and exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction. ERAD deficiency affected ER-mitochondria contacts and mitochondrial dynamics, at least in part, by regulating the turnover of the MAM protein, sigma receptor 1 (SigmaR1). Thus, our study provides molecular insights into ER-mitochondrial cross-talk and expands our understanding of the physiological importance of Sel1L-Hrd1 ERAD.

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