Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Correction to: Genome-wide SNP data unveils the globalization of domesticated pigs
    Yang, Bin ; Cui, Leilei ; Perez-Enciso, Miguel ; Traspov, Aleksei ; Crooijmans, Richard P.M.A. ; Zinovieva, Natalia ; Schook, Lawrence B. ; Archibald, Alan ; Gatphayak, Kesinee ; Knorr, Christophe ; Triantafyllidis, Alex ; Alexandri, Panoraia ; Semiadi, Gono ; Hanotte, Olivier ; Dias, Deodália ; Dovč, Peter ; Uimari, Pekka ; Iacolina, Laura ; Scandura, Massimo ; Groenen, Martien A.M. ; Huang, Lusheng ; Megens, Hendrik Jan - \ 2020
    Genetics, Selection, Evolution 52 (2020)1. - ISSN 0999-193X - 1 p.

    An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via the original article.

    Data from: Genome-wide SNP data unveils the globalization of domesticated pigs
    Yang, Bin ; Cui, Leilei ; Pérez-Enciso, M. ; Traspov, Aleksei ; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A. ; Zinovieva, Natalia ; Schook, Lawrence B. ; Gatphayak, Kesinee ; Knorr, Christophe ; Triantafyllidis, Alex ; Alexandri, Panoraia ; Semiadi, Gono ; Hanotte, Olivier ; Dias, Deodália ; Dovč, Peter ; Uimari, Pekka ; Iacolina, Laura ; Scandura, Massimo ; Groenen, M. ; Huang, L. ; Megens, H.J.W.C. - \ 2017
    National Key Laboratory for Pig Genetic Improvement and Production Technology
    pig - domestication - genome - selection
    Background: Pigs were domesticated independently in Eastern and Western Eurasia early during the agricultural revolution, and have since been transported and traded across the globe. Here, we present a worldwide survey on 60K genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for 2093 pigs, including 1839 domestic pigs representing 122 local and commercial breeds, 215 wild boars, and 39 out-group suids, from Asia, Europe, America, Oceania and Africa. The aim of this study was to infer global patterns in pig domestication and diversity related to demography, migration, and selection. Results: A deep phylogeographic division reflects the dichotomy between early domestication centers. In the core Eastern and Western domestication regions, Chinese pigs show differentiation between breeds due to geographic isolation, whereas this is less pronounced in European pigs. The inferred European origin of pigs in the Americas, Africa, and Australia reflects European expansion during the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Human-mediated introgression, which is due, in particular, to importing Chinese pigs into the UK during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, played an important role in the formation of modern pig breeds. Inbreeding levels vary markedly between populations, from almost no runs of homozygosity (ROH) in a number of Asian wild boar populations, to up to 20% of the genome covered by ROH in a number of Southern European breeds. Commercial populations show moderate ROH statistics. For domesticated pigs and wild boars in Asia and Europe, we identified highly differentiated loci that include candidate genes related to muscle and body development, central nervous system, reproduction, and energy balance, which are putatively under artificial selection. Conclusions: Key events related to domestication, dispersal, and mixing of pigs from different regions are reflected in the 60K SNP data, including the globalization that has recently become full circle since Chinese pig breeders in the past decades started selecting Western breeds to improve local Chinese pigs. Furthermore, signatures of ongoing and past selection, acting at different times and on different genetic backgrounds, enhance our insight in the mechanism of domestication and selection. The global diversity statistics presented here highlight concerns for maintaining agrodiversity, but also provide a necessary framework for directing genetic conservation.
    Genome-wide SNP data unveils the globalization of domesticated pigs
    Yang, Bin ; Cui, Leilei ; Pérez-Enciso, M. ; Traspov, Aleksei ; Crooijmans, Richard P.M.A. ; Zinovieva, Natalia ; Schook, Lawrence B. ; Archibald, Alan ; Gatphayak, Kesinee ; Knorr, Christophe ; Triantafyllidis, Alex ; Alexandri, Panoraia ; Semiadi, Gono ; Hanotte, Olivier ; Dias, Deodália ; Dovč, Peter ; Uimari, Pekka ; Iacolina, Laura ; Scandura, Massimo ; Groenen, Martien A.M. ; Huang, L. ; Megens, Hendrik Jan - \ 2017
    Genetics, Selection, Evolution 49 (2017). - ISSN 0999-193X - 15 p.

    Background: Pigs were domesticated independently in Eastern and Western Eurasia early during the agricultural revolution, and have since been transported and traded across the globe. Here, we present a worldwide survey on 60K genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for 2093 pigs, including 1839 domestic pigs representing 122 local and commercial breeds, 215 wild boars, and 39 out-group suids, from Asia, Europe, America, Oceania and Africa. The aim of this study was to infer global patterns in pig domestication and diversity related to demography, migration, and selection. Results: A deep phylogeographic division reflects the dichotomy between early domestication centers. In the core Eastern and Western domestication regions, Chinese pigs show differentiation between breeds due to geographic isolation, whereas this is less pronounced in European pigs. The inferred European origin of pigs in the Americas, Africa, and Australia reflects European expansion during the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Human-mediated introgression, which is due, in particular, to importing Chinese pigs into the UK during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, played an important role in the formation of modern pig breeds. Inbreeding levels vary markedly between populations, from almost no runs of homozygosity (ROH) in a number of Asian wild boar populations, to up to 20% of the genome covered by ROH in a number of Southern European breeds. Commercial populations show moderate ROH statistics. For domesticated pigs and wild boars in Asia and Europe, we identified highly differentiated loci that include candidate genes related to muscle and body development, central nervous system, reproduction, and energy balance, which are putatively under artificial selection. Conclusions: Key events related to domestication, dispersal, and mixing of pigs from different regions are reflected in the 60K SNP data, including the globalization that has recently become full circle since Chinese pig breeders in the past decades started selecting Western breeds to improve local Chinese pigs. Furthermore, signatures of ongoing and past selection, acting at different times and on different genetic backgrounds, enhance our insight in the mechanism of domestication and selection. The global diversity statistics presented here highlight concerns for maintaining agrodiversity, but also provide a necessary framework for directing genetic conservation.

    Multiple QTL mapping in related plant populations via a pedigree-analysis approach
    Bink, M.C.A.M. ; Uimari, P. ; Sillanpää, M.J. ; Janss, L.L.G. ; Jansen, R.C. - \ 2002
    Theoretical and Applied Genetics 104 (2002)5. - ISSN 0040-5752 - p. 751 - 762.
    quantitative trait loci - chain-monte-carlo - phytophthora-infestans - oligogenic models - bayesian-approach - resistance - prediction - inference - genotypes
    QTL mapping experiments in plant breeding may involve multiple populations or pedigrees that are related through their ancestors. These known relationships have often been ignored for the sake of statistical analysis, despite their potential increase in power of mapping. We describe here a Bayesian method for QTL mapping in complex plant populations and reported the results from its application to a (previously analysed) potato data set. This Bayesian method was originally developed for human genetics data, and we have proved that it is useful for complex plant populations as well, based on a sensitivity analysis that was performed here. The method accommodates robustness to complex structures in pedigree data, full flexibility in the estimation of the number of QTL across multiple chromosomes, thereby accounting for uncertainties in the transmission of QTL and marker alleles due to incomplete marker information, and the simultaneous inclusion of non-genetic factors affecting the quantitative trait.
    Application of multiple QTL mapping in complex plant crosses to partial resistance to late blight (Phytophthora Infestans) in potato: Better insight by using a design-independent method
    Bink, M.C.A.M. ; Uimari, P. ; Sillanpää, M.J. ; Janss, L.L.G. ; Jansen, R.C. - \ 2000
    In: Biometrics in plant breeding, quantitative genetics and breeding methods: the way ahead / Gallais, A., Dillmann, C., Goldringer, I., - p. 73 - 80.
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