Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Cranial fenestration and adaptive potential in the two basal clades of modern birds
    Gussekloo, S.W.S. ; Berthaume, M.A. ; Pulaski, D.R. ; Westbroek, I. ; Waarsing, J.H. ; Heinen, R. ; Grosse, I.R. ; Dumont, E.R. - \ 2017
    Data from: Functional and evolutionary consequences of cranial fenestration in birds
    Gussekloo, S.W.S. ; Berthaume, Michael A. ; Pulaski, Daniel R. ; Westbroek, Irene ; Waarsing, Jan H. ; Heinen, R. ; Grosse, Ian R. ; Dumont, Elizabeth R. - \ 2017
    Wageningen University & Research
    avian evolution - cranial morphology - fenestration - finite element modelling - adaptive radiation
    Ostrich-like birds (Palaeognathae) show very little taxonomic diversity while their sister taxon (Neognathae) contains roughly 10000 species. The main anatomical differences between the two taxa are in the crania. Palaeognaths lack an element in the bill called the lateral bar that is present in both ancestral theropods and modern neognaths, have thin zones in the bones of the bill, and robust bony elements on the ventral surface of their crania. Here we use a combination of modelling and developmental experiments to investigate the processes that might have led to these differences. Engineering-based finite element analyses indicate that removing the lateral bars from a neognath increases mechanical stress in the upper bill and the ventral elements of the skull, regions that are either more robust or more flexible in palaeognaths. Surgically removing the lateral bar from neognath hatchlings led to similar changes. These results indicate that the lateral bar is load-bearing and suggest that this function was transferred to other bony elements when it was lost in palaeognaths. It is possible that the loss of the load-bearing lateral bar might have constrained diversification of skull morphology in palaeognaths and thus limited taxonomic diversity within the group.
    Functional and evolutionary consequences of cranial fenestration in birds
    Gussekloo, Sander W.S. ; Berthaume, Michael A. ; Pulaski, Daniel R. ; Westbroek, Irene ; Waarsing, Jan H. ; Heinen, Robin ; Grosse, Ian R. ; Dumont, Elizabeth R. - \ 2017
    Evolution 71 (2017)5. - ISSN 0014-3820 - p. 1327 - 1338.
    Adaptive radiation - Avian evolution - Cranial morphology - Fenestration - Finite element modeling
    Ostrich-like birds (Palaeognathae) show very little taxonomic diversity while their sister taxon (Neognathae) contains roughly 10,000 species. The main anatomical differences between the two taxa are in the crania. Palaeognaths lack an element in the bill called the lateral bar that is present in both ancestral theropods and modern neognaths, and have thin zones in the bones of the bill, and robust bony elements on the ventral surface of their crania. Here we use a combination of modeling and developmental experiments to investigate the processes that might have led to these differences. Engineering-based finite element analyses indicate that removing the lateral bars from a neognath increases mechanical stress in the upper bill and the ventral elements of the skull, regions that are either more robust or more flexible in palaeognaths. Surgically removing the lateral bar from neognath hatchlings led to similar changes. These results indicate that the lateral bar is load-bearing and suggest that this function was transferred to other bony elements when it was lost in palaeognaths. It is possible that the loss of the load-bearing lateral bar might have constrained diversification of skull morphology in palaeognaths and thus limited taxonomic diversity within the group.
    Flight feather shaft structure of two warbler species with different moult schedules: a study using high-resolution X-ray imaging
    Weber, T.P. ; Kranenbarg, S. ; Hedenström, A. ; Waarsing, J.H. ; Weinans, H. - \ 2010
    Journal of Zoology 280 (2010)2. - ISSN 0952-8369 - p. 163 - 170.
    passer-domesticus - postnuptial molt - strategies - quality - birds - sparrows - africa - bone
    Plumage constitutes a significant component of the somatic investment of birds. A detailed investigation of feathers and moult can help to uncover trade-offs involved in somatic investment decisions, the sources of some of the costs birds have to pay and the potential fitness consequences. We used micro-computed tomography imaging to study the second moment of area, a structural parameter that is one determinant of bending stiffness and the cortex volume of flight feather shafts of two sister taxa, the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus, a migratory species with two annual moults, and the chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita, a migrant with one annual post-nuptial moult. Juvenile and adult willow warbler and chiffchaff feathers, all grown on the breeding grounds, are structurally very similar to each other. Willow warbler feathers grown during moult on the wintering grounds, however, have a significantly higher second moment of area and a significantly larger cortex volume than all the other feather types. We discuss the possibility that the seasonal variability of willow warbler feathers may be an adaptive structural reflection of a moult–migration strategy that has allowed this species to occupy large breeding and wintering ranges
    Lordotic vertebrae in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) are adapted to increased loads
    Kranenbarg, S. ; Waarsing, J.H. ; Muller, M. ; Weinans, H. ; Leeuwen, J.L. van - \ 2005
    Journal of Biomechanics 38 (2005)6. - ISSN 0021-9290 - p. 1239 - 1246.
    skeletal deformities - cervical-spine - sparus-aurata - temperature - swimbladder - lordosis - water
    Lordosis in fish is an abnormal ventral curvature of the vertebral column, accompanied by abnormal calcification of the afflicted vertebrae. Incidences of lordosis are a major problem in aquaculture and often correlate with increased swimming activity. To understand the biomechanical causes and consequences of lordosis, we mapped the morphological changes that occur in the vertebrae of European sea bass during their development from larva to juvenile. Our micro-CT analysis of lordotic and non-lordotic vertebrae revealed significant differences in their micro-architecture. Lordotic vertebrae have a larger bone volume, flattened dorsal zygapophyses and extra lateral ridges. They also have a larger second moment of area (both lateral and dorso-ventral) than non-lordotic vertebrae. This morphology suggests lordotic vertebrae to be adapted to an increased bending moment, caused by the axial musculature during increased swimming activity. We hypothesize the increase in swimming activity to have a two-fold effect in animals that become lordotic. The first effect is buckling failure of the axial skeleton due to an increased compressive load. The second effect is extra bone deposition as an adaptive response of the vertebrae at the cellular level, caused by an increased strain and strain rate in these vertebrae. Lordosis thus comprises both a buckling failure of the vertebral column and a molecular response that adapts the lordotic vertebrae to a new loading regime.
    A quantitative comparison of flight feather shaft structure of two warbler species with different moult schedules
    Weber, T.P. ; Kranenbarg, S. ; Hedenström, A. ; Waarsing, J.H. ; Weinans, H. - \ 2005
    In: 12th Benelux Congress of Zoology, 26-28 October 2005. - - p. 50 - 50.
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