Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

    Records 21 - 40 / 1066

    • help
    • print

      Print search results

    • export
      A maximum of 250 titles can be exported. Please, refine your queryYou can also select and export up to 30 titles via your marked list.
    Check title to add to marked list
    Food perception and emotion measured over time in-lab and in-home
    Wijk, R.A. De; Kaneko, D. ; Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Zoggel, M. van; Schiona, I. ; Visalli, M. ; Zandstra, Liesbeth - \ 2019
    Eating context - Facial expressions - Heart rate - Repeated sensory tests
    Background: Real-life human eating behaviour does not take place in a vacuum, rather it happens in context. The context in which consumers eat their foods influences the acceptance of the consumed foods. Consequently, consumers’ hedonic and sensory ratings elicited in a natural consumption context will differ from those elicited under controlled sensory laboratory conditions. Moreover, foods are rarely consumed on one single occasion but are typically consumed repeatedly and ratings may change over repeated consumptions as well. Often, consumer acceptance is tested explicitly, for example with liking ratings, especially when the testing is done outside the laboratory. Implicit tests such as facial expressions and physiological measurements of the autonomic nervous system can provide additional information on consumer acceptance. As a result of technological advantages, such tests are no longer limited to the laboratory but can also be used in natural consumption contexts. Method: Eighteen healthy Dutch consumers (18–65 years of age) tested four test foods plus a warm-up sample ten times on consecutive weekdays and on similar hours using their own laptop and webcam. Test locations alternated between the sensory laboratory and the participant's own home. Explicit measures included liking scores and scores on ten sensory taste/flavour/texture attributes, and implicit measures included facial expressions, heart rate and consumption duration using Face Reader TM . This study was the first to validate the Face Reader TM for usage at home. Results: The liking scores and sensory profiles varied between test foods (p < 0.05), but not between test locations and only some specific sensory attributes showed systematic variation over repeated consumption. In contrast, implicit measures showed systematic effects of test foods, test locations, and repeated consumptions (p < 0.05). Compared to consumption in the laboratory, consumption at home was faster, triggered higher heart rates, and triggered more intense facial expressions of happiness, contempt, disgust and boredom. Conclusions: Implicit tests were more sensitive to effects of test location and repeated consumption than explicit tests. Additional research is required to investigate the relevance of these measures to long term consumer acceptance of food products.
    Effects of eating context on food perception are not caused by the eating location itself
    Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Kaneko, D. ; Wijk, R.A. de; Zoggel, M. van; Schiona, Irene ; Zandstra, Liesbeth - \ 2019
    Effects of eating context on food perception are not caused by the eating location itself
    Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Kaneko, D. ; Wijk, R.A. de; Zoggel, M. van; Schiona, Irene ; Zandstra, E.H. - \ 2019
    PPS-project onderzoekt effect omgeving op voedselgewoonten
    Wijk, Rene de; Dijksterhuis, Garmt - \ 2019
    Impact of on-pack visual cues on household premeditated food waste
    Janssen, A.M. ; Bos-Brouwers, H.E.J. ; Schnabel, S.K. ; Wijk, R.A. de; Tromp, S.O. - \ 2019
    Gezonde Wijk en SEGV Lokale aanpak
    Mulderij, Lisanne ; Wagemakers, Annemarie - \ 2019
    Gezonde Wijk
    Mulderij, Lisanne ; Verkooijen, Kirsten - \ 2019
    Minder ADHD in groene wijk
    Vries, S. de - \ 2019
    In wijken met meer groen gebruiken minder kinderen ADHD-medicatie, blijkt uit Wagenings onderzoek. Dit geldt vooral voor armere wijken. Ook zijn de verschillen in mentale gezondheid tussen mensen met lagere en hogere inkomens aanzienlijk kleiner in een groene woonomgeving dan wanneer de woonomgeving minder groen is. Met adviezen aan overheden, projectontwikkelaars en stedenbouwkundigen dragen Wageningse onderzoekers bij aan een gezondere leefomgeving. Denk je dat we meer kunnen investeren in groen voor onze gezondheid?

    Schone wiet telen: deze onderzoeker bewijst dat het kan
    Poot, E.H. - \ 2019
    A perspective on water quality in connected systems: modelling feedback between upstream and downstream transport and local ecological processes
    Teurlincx, Sven ; Wijk, Dianneke van; Mooij, Wolf M. ; Kuiper, Jan J. ; Huttunen, Inese ; Brederveld, Robert J. ; Chang, Manqi ; Janse, Jan H. ; Woodward, Ben ; Hu, Fenjuan ; Janssen, Annette B.G. - \ 2019
    Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 40 (2019). - ISSN 1877-3435 - p. 21 - 29.

    Food production for a growing world population relies on application of fertilisers and pesticides on agricultural lands. However, these substances threaten surface water quality and thereby endanger valued ecosystem services such as drinking water supply, food production and recreational water use. Such deleterious effects do not merely arise on the local scale, but also on the regional scale through transport of substances as well as energy and biota across the catchment. Here we argue that aquatic ecosystem models can provide a process-based understanding of how these transports by water and organisms as vectors affect – and are affected by – ecosystem state and functioning in networks of connected lakes. Such a catchment scale approach is key to setting critical limits for the release of substances by agricultural practices and other human pressures on aquatic ecosystems. Thereby, water and food production and the trade-offs between them may be managed more sustainably.

    Integrated modelling and management of water resources: the ecosystem perspective on the nexus approach
    Hülsmann, Stephan ; Sušnik, Janez ; Rinke, Karsten ; Langan, Simon ; Wijk, Dianneke van; Janssen, Annette B.G. ; Mooij, Wolf M. - \ 2019
    Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 40 (2019). - ISSN 1877-3435 - p. 14 - 20.

    Addressing challenges of water, energy and food security, nexus approaches towards resources management are being developed and starting to be implemented. However, the ecosystem perspective, essential for sustainable resources management, has been identified as a missing element within earlier nexus assessments. With regard to water they have mainly focused on the allocation to different sectors and users, while ecosystem services were rarely explicitly addressed. Existing aquatic ecosystem models are capable of quantifying a wide range of ecosystem services, but have thus far not been comprehensively used in a nexus context. Recent developments in aquatic ecosystem modelling approaches provide opportunities to achieve the sought integration of ecosystem services in the nexus approach. Therefore, we argue for a stronger role of aquatic ecosystem models in nexus assessments.

    A Generically Parameterized model of Lake eutrophication (GPLake) that links field-, lab- and model-based knowledge
    Chang, Manqi ; Teurlincx, Sven ; DeAngelis, Donald L. ; Janse, Jan H. ; Troost, Tineke A. ; Wijk, Dianneke van; Mooij, Wolf M. ; Janssen, Annette B.G. - \ 2019
    Science of the Total Environment 695 (2019). - ISSN 0048-9697
    Consumer-resource interactions - Nutrient versus light limitation - PCLake - Phytoplankton - Vollenweider - Water quality management

    Worldwide, eutrophication is threatening lake ecosystems. To support lake management numerous eutrophication models have been developed. Diverse research questions in a wide range of lake ecosystems are addressed by these models. The established models are based on three key approaches: the empirical approach that employs field surveys, the theoretical approach in which models based on first principles are tested against lab experiments, and the process-based approach that uses parameters and functions representing detailed biogeochemical processes. These approaches have led to an accumulation of field-, lab- and model-based knowledge, respectively. Linking these sources of knowledge would benefit lake management by exploiting complementary information; however, the development of a simple tool that links these approaches was hampered by their large differences in scale and complexity. Here we propose a Generically Parameterized Lake eutrophication model (GPLake) that links field-, lab- and model-based knowledge and can be used to make a first diagnosis of lake water quality. We derived GPLake from consumer-resource theory by the principle that lacustrine phytoplankton is typically limited by two resources: nutrients and light. These limitations are captured in two generic parameters that shape the nutrient to chlorophyll-a relations. Next, we parameterized GPLake, using knowledge from empirical, theoretical, and process-based approaches. GPLake generic parameters were found to scale in a comparable manner across data sources. Finally, we show that GPLake can be applied as a simple tool that provides lake managers with a first diagnosis of the limiting factor and lake water quality, using only the parameters for lake depth, residence time and current nutrient loading. With this first-order assessment, lake managers can easily assess measures such as reducing nutrient load, decreasing residence time or changing depth before spending money on field-, lab- or model- experiments to support lake management.

    Wageningen University meet hitte boven Amsterdam met weerballon
    Steeneveld, G.J. ; Heusinkveld, B.G. - \ 2019

    Onderzoekers van Wageningen University lieten woensdag meerdere weerballonnen op vanaf de Dam in Amsterdam. Het uiteindelijke doel: een weerbericht per wijk.

    Household-level drivers of dietary diversity in transitioning agricultural systems : Evidence from the Greater Mekong Subregion
    Ritzema, R.S. ; Douxchamps, S. ; Fraval, S. ; Bolliger, A. ; Hok, L. ; Phengsavanh, P. ; Long, C.T.M. ; Hammond, J. ; Wijk, M.T. van - \ 2019
    Agricultural Systems 176 (2019). - ISSN 0308-521X
    Agricultural transition - Cambodia - Dietary diversity - Greater Mekong Subregion - Household Dietary Diversity Score - Laos - Vietnam

    Over the past four decades, agricultural systems in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) have largely evolved from a subsistence orientation toward commercial production, but the multi-faceted changes behind this evolution vary in substance and degree. Despite connoting economic progress, effects of these changes on household welfare indicators such as dietary diversity have been unclear. By taking a comprehensive view of the farm household, this study discerns the drivers of household dietary diversity in this transitional context by linking the Household Dietary Diversity Score (HDDS), as an indicator of dietary diversity, to key household characteristics, livelihood strategies and indicators of farm performance in three study sites in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam. The Rural Household Multi-Indicator Survey (RHoMIS) tool, a combined survey and analysis platform, was employed to collect data from over 1300 farm households. HDDS is found to increase among the sites in a way that is roughly associated with their state of agricultural transition, though differing combinations of market orientation, specialisation, and intensification traits that describe such a transition suggest that the pathway to commercialisation, and dietary diversity, is not a linear one. Drivers of dietary diversity vary markedly between the sites. In the Laos site, HDDS is most closely correlated to a set of variables closely linked with agricultural transition, while in the Cambodia site it is associated more with other farm and household characteristics. In the Vietnam site, dietary diversity is correlated to the overall value of crop production. Findings point to the need to contextualise site-specific knowledge of linkages between dietary diversity and ongoing agricultural transition in the GMS, as well as policy and interventions seeking to improve dietary diversity in the face of such transition.

    Vulnerability and adaptation options to climate change for rural livelihoods – A country-wide analysis for Uganda
    Wichern, Jannike ; Descheemaeker, Katrien ; Giller, Ken E. ; Ebanyat, Peter ; Taulya, Godfrey ; Wijk, Mark T. van - \ 2019
    Agricultural Systems 176 (2019). - ISSN 0308-521X
    Crop suitability - East Africa - Household food security - Impact assessment - Multi-level

    Rural households in sub-Saharan Africa earn a substantial part of their living from rain-fed smallholder agriculture, which is highly sensitive to climate change. There is a growing number of multi-level assessments on impacts and adaptation options for African smallholder systems under climate change, yet few studies translate impacts at the individual crop level to vulnerability at the household level, at which other livelihood activities need to be considered. Further, these assessments often use representative household types rather than considering the diversity of households for the identification of larger-scale patterns at sub-national and national levels. We developed a framework that combines crop suitability maps with a household food availability analysis to quantify household vulnerability to climate-related impacts on crop production and effects of adaptation options. The framework was tested for Uganda, identifying four hotspots of household vulnerability across the country. Hotspots were visually identified as areas with a relatively high concentration of vulnerable households, experiencing a decline in household crop suitability. About 30% of the households in the hotspots in (central) southwest were vulnerable to a combination of 3 °C temperature increase and 10% rainfall decline through declining suitability for several key crops (including highland banana, cassava, maize and sorghum). In contrast only 10% of the households in West Nile and central northern Uganda were negatively affected, and these were mainly affected by declining suitability of common beans. Households that depended on common beans and lived at lower elevations in West Nile and central north were vulnerable to a 2 to 3 °C temperature increase, while households located at higher elevations (above 1100–2000 m.a.s.l. depending on the crop) benefited from such an increase. Options for adaptation to increasing temperatures were most beneficial in northern Uganda, while drought-related adaptation options were more beneficial in the southwest. This framework provides a basis for decision makers who need information on where the vulnerable households are, what crops drive the vulnerability at household level and which intervention efforts are most beneficial in which regions.

    On the communication of statistical information about uncertainty in flood risk management
    Poortvliet, P.M. ; Knotters, Martin ; Bergsma, Petra ; Verstoep, Joël ; Wijk, Jiska van - \ 2019
    Safety Science 118 (2019). - ISSN 0925-7535 - p. 194 - 204.
    Decision analysis - Flood risk management - Risk communication - Uncertainty

    Uncertainty analysis is not typically performed in hydrological and hydraulic modelling. This is problematic because this may lead to inefficient decision making in water management. We therefore explored the role of statistical knowledge on uncertainty in decision-making processes in long term flood risk management within the context of regional water boards in the Netherlands. Research questions were: (1) in which parts of flood risk management statistical information about uncertainty is presented to professionals of district water boards, and in which forms?; (2) how is this information interpreted and used by these professionals, and how does this influence decision-making processes in district water boards?; and (3) how can communication about statistically quantified uncertainty be improved? To answer these questions we conducted interviews and surveys among professionals and board members of Dutch district water boards. Results suggest that statistical information on uncertainty is hard to interpret by professionals. The amount of statistical information on uncertainty strongly reduces during the decision making process, during which the information transforms from quantitative to qualitative. As a result the statistical information on uncertainty is not utilized to solve flood risk management decision problems. These decision problems are not formulated within statistical frameworks for decision making, and statistical information on uncertainty is not collected and presented with the purpose to be input of such frameworks. Practical recommendations for long term flood risk management are discussed.

    Food security in a changing world : disentangling the diversity of rural livelihood strategies across Uganda
    Wichern, Jannike - \ 2019
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): K.E. Giller, co-promotor(en): K.K.E. Descheemaeker; Mark T. van Wijk. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463439411 - 224

    Climate change increasingly challenges smallholder farming and our ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 2 (Zero Hunger) in sub-Saharan Africa. Agricultural interventions are needed that aim at improving the food insecurity of the most vulnerable rural households. Interventions must fit the local context of a diverse population of rural households, and a key challenge is to identify which kinds of interventions work in which regions and for which households. Micro-level information can account for this diversity, but is an underused source of information for planning of interventions at national and sub-national levels.

    In this thesis, I explored how micro-level information from cross-country household survey data can be used for effective planning of interventions. A further research aim was to understand within-country patterns of livelihood strategies in relation to food security and vulnerability to climate change of rural households in Uganda. Cross-country household data from the World Bank Living Standard Measurement Survey – Integrated Surveys on Agriculture (LSMS-ISA) were used to 1) aggregate household level information to higher levels (e.g. districts, regions, livelihood zones), 2) spatially interpolate household level information and 3) identify hotspot areas of household vulnerability. I used data that I collected from two sites in Uganda for an in-depth analysis on current coping strategies of households for climate and price variability. Household food security was approximated using a food availability indicator that quantified the contribution of livelihood activities to household food availability.

    Livelihood strategies of rural households across Uganda varied with household food availability. They changed from subsistence-oriented on-farm activities to market-oriented on-farm and off-farm activities as household food availability increased. Aggregation revealed spatial differences in food availability and livelihood activities. However, a geostatistical interpolation approach showed that local variability in food availability and livelihood activities was often larger than variability across larger areas. These findings stress that the large diversity in livelihood activities within any given area must be recognised in decision making at higher levels.

    Climate change scenarios were linked to the household livelihood activities to identify hotspot areas of vulnerable households in a country-wide assessment of climate change impacts on crop suitability. Groups of crop-related adaptation options were determined per hotspot area. Adaptation options related to temperature were suitable in the north, while drought-related adaptation options were more suitable in the southwest of Uganda. An in-depth analysis indicated that few ex-ante coping strategies were applied under current climate and price variability. Such coping strategies mostly required little financial investment such as switching crops, which was common for households with more land available. Households tended to react to shocks rather than taking preventive action. Better-off households compensated for crop losses by selling livestock or relying more on off-farm income, while the poor and food insecure lacked the resources to do so. These findings suggest that lack of resources can prevent households from adapting to climate change, even when adaptation options are useful from an agronomic perspective. Therefore, contextualised research is needed to understand local barriers to adoption, so that adaptation options can be tailored to local contexts and underpinned by enabling policies and institutional arrangements.

    Current top-down approaches to planning interventions ignore local diversity of livelihood strategies and food security. However, my results demonstrate that food security and vulnerability tend to be locally driven with large variability at small scale. Therefore, I propose a three-step approach for using micro-level information for multi-level planning. Step 1 disentangles livelihood diversity using cross-country household surveys. Step 2 locates important production activities (Pathway 2a) or vulnerable households and suitable adaptation options (Pathway 2b). Step 3 uses site-specific household surveys to assess which interventions work for which groups of households in the local context. This approach adds to existing approaches by generating spatially-explicit and quantitative information on livelihood activities for food availability and on household vulnerability, while accounting for the diversity of households within and across areas. It enables the exploration and tailoring of intervention options under different future scenarios. In this way, my work contributes to identifying pathways to achieve zero hunger by 2030 in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Success of lake restoration depends on spatial aspects of nutrient loading and hydrology
    Janssen, Annette B.G. ; Wijk, Dianneke van; Gerven, Luuk P.A. van; Bakker, Elisabeth S. ; Brederveld, Robert J. ; DeAngelis, Donald L. ; Janse, Jan H. ; Mooij, Wolf M. - \ 2019
    Science of the Total Environment 679 (2019). - ISSN 0048-9697 - p. 248 - 259.
    Alternative stable states - Diffuse source - Management - PCLake - Point source - Spatial heterogeneity

    Many aquatic ecosystems have deteriorated due to human activities and their restoration is often troublesome. It is proposed here that the restoration success of deteriorated lakes critically depends on hitherto largely neglected spatial heterogeneity in nutrient loading and hydrology. A modelling approach is used to study this hypothesis by considering four lake types with contrasting nutrient loading (point versus diffuse)and hydrology (seepage versus drainage). By comparing the longterm effect of common restoration measures (nutrient load reduction, lake flushing or biomanipulation)in these four lake types, we found that restoration through reduction of nutrient loading is effective in all cases. In contrast, biomanipulation only works in seepage lakes with diffuse nutrient inputs, while lake flushing will even be counterproductive in lakes with nutrient point sources. The main conclusion of the presented analysis is that a priori assessment of spatial heterogeneity caused by nutrient loading and hydrology is essential for successful restoration of lake ecosystems.

    Food security in rural sub-Saharan Africa : a household level assessment of crop-livestock systems
    Fraval, Simon - \ 2019
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): I.J.M. de Boer, co-promotor(en): S.J. Oosting; M.T. van Wijk. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463435734 - 179

    Members of rural households in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are both vulnerable to the health burdens that stem from food insecurity and central to improving the availability and affordability of wholesome foods. It has been estimated that chronic and hidden hunger can be alleviated by implementing a suite of nutrition-specific interventions at a cost of US\$9.6 billion per annum. This can be accelerated with complementary food system-based interventions. However, such interventions are hampered by a limited understanding of food security status and its associations with rural livelihoods. Therefore, the primary objective of this thesis was to describe, analyse and understand food security in rural landholding households in predominantly mixed crop-livestock agricultural systems of sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The secondary objective was to improve the methodological basis of household level food security studies.

    The rural household multi-indicator survey (RHOMIS) tool was developed to describe and analyse the circumstances of rural households. The RHOMIS tool aims to adhere to the principles of being time-efficient, utilitarian, user-friendly, flexible and reliable. The credibility, consistency and reliability of data collected using three different farm household surveys. The shorter and more targeted survey tool, RHOMIS, performed better in terms of staying within credible bounds. Measurements of maize yields and land area owned were found to be less reliable than other variables. Despite the limitations in data quality, our analysis shows that if the same farm households are followed over time, the sample sizes needed to detect substantial changes are in the order of hundreds of surveys, and not in the thousands.

    The RHOMIS tool was then used to quantify changes in livelihoods and food security status in an urban linked, high potential region of Tanzania. Households in the study site adaptively responded to local and national circumstances. Changes in land ownership, livestock-holdings and high value crop production were most likely related to market opportunities and personal circumstances, rather than to direct interventions. Several households made strategic changes by expanding land ownership, planting perennial crops and investing in exotic cattle breeds; many households tactically utilised their land for diversified, mixed crop-livestock production. A central finding of this study is that the complex risk management strategies and market responsiveness demonstrated by the `Rising' clusters are at odds with single focus activities that external organisations tend to promote.

    Subsequently, instances of chronic and hidden hunger were analysed in two provinces of Burkina Faso. The results of this study show that in both provinces, the ability to purchase food is what differentiates the more food secure households from their less food secure counterparts. This finding does not detract from the utility of subsistence production -- where consumption of own-farm sourced food catered for between 72\% and 91\% of the annual energy requirements. Further, households were observed to be pursuing market-oriented strategies in combination with production diversification -- likely to reduce risk exposure to climatic or economic shocks.

    In a large sample of households across SSA, we found that as many as 40\% of households were classified as chronically hungry in the lean period. Prevalence of micronutrient dietary gaps were high, ranging from 35\% of households to 68\%. Vulnerability to dietary gaps differed by household composition, livelihood characteristics and agro-ecological zone (AEZ). It is the combination of livelihood characteristics and the agro-ecological production potential that drive the availability of food and income. It was found that households fail to purchase food categories that nutritionally complement their own agricultural products. Furthermore, households with a livestock component to their farm were found to have a lower prevalence of chronic and hidden hunger.

    In extended analyses, the gender of household head and stage of life were found to be associated with the number of household inhabitants and thus influence nutritional requirements and food security status throughout the year. The high prevalence of food insecurity, the complexity of associations and the failure to nutritionally complement own-production with purchases have implications for developing effective interventions. Programs can be designed as `packages' of agricultural and non-agricultural interventions to maximise adoption and maximise the positive impact on food and nutrition security throughout the year.

    Food perception and emotion measured over time in-lab and in-home
    Wijk, R.A. De; Kaneko, D. ; Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Zoggel, M. van; Schiona, I. ; Visalli, M. ; Zandstra, E.H. - \ 2019
    Food Quality and Preference 75 (2019). - ISSN 0950-3293 - p. 170 - 178.
    Eating context - Facial expressions - Heart rate - Repeated sensory tests
    Background: Real-life human eating behaviour does not take place in a vacuum, rather it happens in context. The context in which consumers eat their foods influences the acceptance of the consumed foods. Consequently, consumers’ hedonic and sensory ratings elicited in a natural consumption context will differ from those elicited under controlled sensory laboratory conditions. Moreover, foods are rarely consumed on one single occasion but are typically consumed repeatedly and ratings may change over repeated consumptions as well. Often, consumer acceptance is tested explicitly, for example with liking ratings, especially when the testing is done outside the laboratory. Implicit tests such as facial expressions and physiological measurements of the autonomic nervous system can provide additional information on consumer acceptance. As a result of technological advantages, such tests are no longer limited to the laboratory but can also be used in natural consumption contexts. Method: Eighteen healthy Dutch consumers (18–65 years of age) tested four test foods plus a warm-up sample ten times on consecutive weekdays and on similar hours using their own laptop and webcam. Test locations alternated between the sensory laboratory and the participant's own home. Explicit measures included liking scores and scores on ten sensory taste/flavour/texture attributes, and implicit measures included facial expressions, heart rate and consumption duration using Face Reader TM . This study was the first to validate the Face Reader TM for usage at home. Results: The liking scores and sensory profiles varied between test foods (p < 0.05), but not between test locations and only some specific sensory attributes showed systematic variation over repeated consumption. In contrast, implicit measures showed systematic effects of test foods, test locations, and repeated consumptions (p < 0.05). Compared to consumption in the laboratory, consumption at home was faster, triggered higher heart rates, and triggered more intense facial expressions of happiness, contempt, disgust and boredom. Conclusions: Implicit tests were more sensitive to effects of test location and repeated consumption than explicit tests. Additional research is required to investigate the relevance of these measures to long term consumer acceptance of food products.
    Check title to add to marked list

    Show 20 50 100 records per page

     
    Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.