Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

    Records 1 - 20 / 118

    • help
    • print

      Print search results

    • export

      Export search results

    Check title to add to marked list
    A specific synbiotic-containing amino acid-based formula in dietary management of cow’s milk allergy: a randomized controlled trial
    Fox, Adam T. ; Wopereis, H.J. ; Ampting, Marleen T.J. Van; Oude Nijhuis, Manon M. ; Butt, Assad M. ; Peroni, Diego G. ; Vandenplas, Yvan ; Candy, David C.A. ; Shah, Neil ; West, Christina E. ; Garssen, Johan ; Harthoorn, Lucien F. ; Knol, Jan ; Michaelis, Louise J. - \ 2019
    Wageningen University and Research
    Bifidobacterium breve M-16V - Gut microbiota - Prebiotic - Probiotic - Cow's milk allergy - Symptoms
    Here we report follow-up data from a double-blind, randomized, controlled multicenter trial, which investigated fecal microbiota changes with a new amino acid-based formula (AAF) including synbiotics in infants with non-immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated cow’s milk allergy (CMA). Methods Subjects were randomized to receive test product (AAF including fructo-oligosaccharides and Bifidobacterium breve M-16V) or control product (AAF) for 8 weeks, after which infants could continue study product until 26 weeks. Fecal percentages of bifidobacteria and Eubacterium rectale/Clostridium coccoides group (ER/CC) were assessed at 0, 8, 12, and 26 weeks. Additional endpoints included stool markers of gut immune status, clinical symptoms, and safety assessments including adverse events and medication use. Results The trial included 35 test subjects, 36 controls, and 51 in the healthy reference group. Study product was continued by 86% and 92% of test and control subjects between week 8–12, and by 71% and 80%, respectively until week 26. At week 26 median percentages of bifidobacteria were significantly higher in test than control [47.0% vs. 11.8% (p < 0.001)], whereas percentages of ER/CC were significantly lower [(13.7% vs. 23.6% (p = 0.003)]. Safety parameters were similar between groups. Interestingly use of dermatological medication and reported ear infections were lower in test versus control, p = 0.019 and 0.011, respectively. Baseline clinical symptoms and stool markers were mild (but persistent) and low, respectively. Symptoms reduced towards lowest score in both groups. Conclusion Beneficial effects of this AAF including specific synbiotics on microbiota composition were observed over 26 weeks, and shown suitable for dietary management of infants with non-IgE-mediated CMA. Trial Registration NTR3979
    Whole Grain Wheat Consumption Affects Postprandial Inflammatory Response in a Randomized Controlled Trial in Overweight and Obese Adults with Mild Hypercholesterolemia in the Graandioos Study
    Hoevenaars, Femke P.M. ; Esser, Diederik ; Schutte, Sophie ; Priebe, Marion G. ; Vonk, Roel J. ; Brink, Willem J. van den; Kamp, Jan Willem van der; Stroeve, Johanna H.M. ; Afman, Lydia A. ; Wopereis, Suzan - \ 2019
    The Journal of Nutrition 149 (2019)12. - ISSN 0022-3166 - p. 2133 - 2144.
    (compromised) healthy subjects - challenge test - composite biomarkers - inflammation - liver - metabolic health - phenotypic flexibility - resilience - whole grain wheat

    BACKGROUND: Whole grain wheat (WGW) consumption is associated with health benefits in observational studies. However, WGW randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies show mixed effects. OBJECTIVES: The health impact of WGW consumption was investigated by quantification of the body's resilience, which was defined as the "ability to adapt to a standardized challenge." METHODS: A double-blind RCT was performed with overweight and obese (BMI: 25-35 kg/m2) men (n = 19) and postmenopausal women (n = 31) aged 45-70 y, with mildly elevated plasma total cholesterol (>5 mmol/L), who were randomly assigned to either 12-wk WGW (98 g/d) or refined wheat (RW). Before and after the intervention a standardized mixed-meal challenge was performed. Plasma samples were taken after overnight fasting and postprandially (30, 60, 120, and 240 min). Thirty-one biomarkers were quantified focusing on metabolism, liver, cardiovascular health, and inflammation. Linear mixed-models evaluated fasting compared with postprandial intervention effects. Health space models were used to evaluate intervention effects as composite markers representing resilience of inflammation, liver, and metabolism. RESULTS: Postprandial biomarker changes related to liver showed decreased alanine aminotransferase by WGW (P = 0.03) and increased β-hydroxybutyrate (P = 0.001) response in RW. Postprandial changes related to inflammation showed increased C-reactive protein (P = 0.001), IL-6 (P = 0.02), IL-8 (P = 0.007), and decreased IL-1B (P = 0.0002) in RW and decreased C-reactive protein (P < 0.0001), serum amyloid A (P < 0.0001), IL-8 (P = 0.02), and IL-10 (P < 0.0001) in WGW. Health space visualization demonstrated diminished inflammatory (P < 0.01) and liver resilience (P < 0.01) by RW, whereas liver resilience was rejuvenated by WGW (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Twelve-week 98 g/d WGW consumption can promote liver and inflammatory resilience in overweight and obese subjects with mildly elevated plasma cholesterol. The health space approach appeared appropriate to evaluate intervention effects as composite markers. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02385149.

    Beneficial effect of personalized lifestyle advice compared to generic advice on wellbeing among Dutch seniors – An explorative study
    Doets, Esmée L. ; Hoogh, Iris M. de; Holthuysen, Nancy ; Wopereis, Suzan ; Verain, Muriel C.D. ; Puttelaar, Jos van den; Hogenelst, Koen ; Boorsma, André ; Bouwman, Emily P. ; Timmer, Marielle ; Pasman, Wilrike J. ; Erk, Marjan van; Reinders, Machiel J. - \ 2019
    Physiology and Behavior 210 (2019). - ISSN 0031-9384
    Lifestyle behavior - Muscle health - Older adults - Personalized nutrition - Web-based feedback - Wellbeing

    The aim of this explorative study is to evaluate whether personalized compared to generic lifestyle advice improves wellbeing in a senior population. We conducted a nine-week single-blind randomized controlled trial including 59 participants (age 67.7 ± 4.8 years) from Wageningen and its surrounding areas in the Netherlands. Three times during the intervention period, participants received either personalized advice (PA), or generic advice (GA) to improve lifestyle behavior. Personalization was based on metabolic health measures and dietary intake resulting in an advice that highlighted food groups and physical activity types for which behavior change was most urgent. Before and after the intervention period self-perceived health was evaluated as parameter of wellbeing using a self-perceived health score (single-item) and two questionnaires (Vita-16 and Short Form-12). Additionally, anthropometry and physical functioning (short physical performance battery, SPPB) were assessed. Overall scores for self-perceived health did not change over time in any group. Resilience and motivation (Vita-16) slightly improved only in the PA group, whilst mental health (SF-12) and energy (Vita-16) showed slight improvement only in the GA group. SPPB scores improved over time in both the PA and GA group. PA participants also showed a reduction in body fat percentage and hip circumference, whereas these parameters increased in the GA group Our findings suggest that although no clear effects on wellbeing were found, still, at least on the short term, personalized advice may evoke health benefits in a population of seniors as compared to generic advice.

    Supplementation of diet with non-digestible oligosaccharides alters the intestinal microbiota, but not arthritis development, in IL-1 receptor antagonist deficient mice
    Rogier, Rebecca ; Ederveen, Thomas H.A. ; Wopereis, Harm ; Hartog, Anita ; Boekhorst, Jos ; Hijum, Sacha A.F.T. Van; Knol, Jan ; Garssen, Johan ; Walgreen, Birgitte ; Helsen, Monique M. ; Kraan, Peter M. Van Der; Lent, Peter L.E.M. Van; De Loo, Fons A.J. Van; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla ; Koenders, Marije I. - \ 2019
    PLoS ONE 14 (2019)7. - ISSN 1932-6203

    The intestinal microbiome is perturbed in patients with new-onset and chronic autoimmune inflammatory arthritis. Recent studies in mouse models suggest that development and progression of autoimmune arthritis is highly affected by the intestinal microbiome. This makes modulation of the intestinal microbiota an interesting novel approach to suppress inflammatory arthritis. Prebiotics, defined as non-digestible carbohydrates that selectively stimulate the growth and activity of beneficial microorganisms, provide a relatively non-invasive approach to modulate the intestinal microbiota. The aim of this study was to assess the therapeutic potential of dietary supplementation with a prebiotic mixture of 90% short-chain galacto-oligosaccharides and 10% long-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scGOS/lcFOS) in experimental arthritis in mice. We here show that dietary supplementation with scGOS/ lcFOS has a pronounced effect on the composition of the fecal microbiota. Interestingly, the genera Enterococcus and Clostridium were markedly decreased by scGOS/lcFOS dietary supplementation. In contrast, the family Lachnospiraceae and the genus Lactobacillus, both associated with healthy microbiota, increased in mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS diet. However, the scGOS/lcFOS induced alterations of the intestinal microbiota did not induce significant effects on the intestinal and systemic T helper cell subsets and were not sufficient to reproducibly suppress arthritis in mice. As expected, we did observe a significant increase in the bone mineral density in mice upon dietary supplementation with scGOS/lcFOS for 8 weeks. Altogether, this study suggests that dietary scGOS/lcFOS supplementation is able to promote presumably healthy gut microbiota and improve bone mineral density, but not inflammation, in arthritis-prone mice.

    A specific synbiotic-containing amino acid-based formula restores gut microbiota in non-IgE mediated cow's milk allergic infants: A randomized controlled trial
    Wopereis, Harm ; Ampting, Marleen T.J. Van; Cetinyurek-Yavuz, Aysun ; Slump, Rob ; Candy, David C.A. ; Butt, Assad M. ; Peroni, Diego G. ; Vandenplas, Yvan ; Fox, Adam T. ; Shah, Neil ; Roeselers, Guus ; Harthoorn, Lucien F. ; Michaelis, Louise J. ; Knol, Jan ; West, Christina E. - \ 2019
    Clinical and Translational Allergy 9 (2019)1. - ISSN 2045-7022
    Cow's milk allergy - Gut microbiota - Pediatrics - Prebiotics - Probiotics

    Background: Altered gut microbiota is implicated in cow's milk allergy (CMA) and differs markedly from healthy, breastfed infants. Infants who suffer from severe CMA often rely on cow's milk protein avoidance and, when breastfeeding is not possible, on specialised infant formulas such as amino-acid based formulas (AAF). Herein, we report the effects of an AAF including specific synbiotics on oral and gastrointestinal microbiota of infants with non-IgE mediated CMA with reference to healthy, breastfed infants. Methods: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled study, infants with suspected non-IgE mediated CMA received test or control formula. Test formula was AAF with synbiotics (prebiotic fructo-oligosaccharides and probiotic Bifidobacterium breve M-16V). Control formula was AAF without synbiotics. Healthy, breastfed infants were used as a separate reference group (HBR). Bacterial compositions of faecal and salivary samples were analysed by 16S rRNA-gene sequencing. Faecal analysis was complemented with the analysis of pH, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and lactic acids. Results: The trial included 35 test subjects, 36 controls, and 51 HBR. The 16S rRNA-gene sequencing revealed moderate effects of test formula on oral microbiota. In contrast, the gut microbiota was substantially affected across time comparing test with control. In both groups bacterial diversity increased over time but was characterised by a more gradual increment in test compared to control. Compositionally this reflected an enhancement of Bifidobacterium spp. and Veillonella sp. in the test group. In contrast, the control-fed infants showed increased abundance of adult-like species, mainly within the Lachnospiraceae family, as well as within the Ruminococcus and Alistipes genus. The effects on Bifidobacterium spp. and Lachnospiraceae spp. were previously confirmed through enumeration by fluorescent in situ hybridization and were shown for test to approximate the proportions observed in the HBR. Additionally, microbial activity was affected as evidenced by an increase of l-lactate, a decrease of valerate, and reduced concentrations of branched-chain SCFAs in test versus control. Conclusions: The AAF including specific synbiotics effectively modulates the gut microbiota and its metabolic activity in non-IgE mediated CMA infants bringing it close to a healthy breastfed profile. Trial registration Registered on 1 May 2013 with Netherlands Trial Register Number NTR3979.

    The development of early life gut microbiota in health and allergic disease
    Wopereis, Harm - \ 2019
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): J. Knol; W.M. de Vos, co-promotor(en): C. Belzer. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463434157 - 184

    The development of the gut microbiome from birth through to childhood is thought to be important for establishing a healthy symbiosis, but much is yet to be learnt about this phase of microbiome development. Perturbations of gut microbiome during this development have been associated with the pathology of diseases, such as allergy. In Chapter 2, we describe this dynamic period of gut microbiome development, the various factors involved in shaping its composition and the importance for the concurrent maturation of the immune system. Environmental factors including birth mode, exposure to antibiotics and household exposures (such as siblings and furry pets) represent important factors impacting its development, and which also have been epidemiologically implicated in the risk to develop allergic disease. Several paediatric studies indeed associated altered gut microbiota with development of allergic disease. Breastfeeding represents the most significant factor in shaping early life microbiome and is associated with several short-term and long-term health benefits, including a lower risk of developing allergic disease. Specific prebiotic or synbiotic (when combined with probiotics) ingredients added to infant formula may exert similar effects on gut microbiota composition and activity, which may benefit infants for whom breastfeeding is not possible.

    Bifidobacteria are the most abundant bacteria in breastfed infants, but often under-represented in 16S rRNA surveys of diversity, due to poor DNA extraction techniques, poor PCR primer choice or a combination of both. In Chapter 3, we optimized a commonly used “universal” PCR primer set and demonstrated the effective recovery of this genus without compromising the detection of other genera. In Chapter 4 we applied the optimized pyrosequencing method described in Chapter 3 to analyse the gut microbiota of infants at high-risk of developing allergy, who participated in a clinical trial that investigated the effects of a partially hydrolysed protein formula supplemented with prebiotics on the prevention of eczema. We showed that the taxonomic composition of infants receiving the prebiotic-supplemented formula was closer to that of breastfed infants when compared to infants receiving an infant formula based on intact protein without prebiotics, which was driven by increased abundance of Bifidobacterium spp. and decreased abundances of Clostridium spp. and Lachnospiraceae spp. Importantly this also led to specific changes in gut eco-physiology characterized by a more acidic pH and increased levels of lactate and acetate as also characteristic for breastfed infants. In a nested case-control, we found that infants who developed eczema by 18 months of age showed an altered development of bacterial taxa and metabolites around the time that complementary feeding was started. The patterns identified suggested that the establishment of specific bacteria that utilize lactate and acetate to produce butyrate may have a role in protecting from the development of eczema.

    Infants who suffer from severe CMA often rely on cow's milk protein avoidance and, when breastfeeding is not possible, on specialised infant formulas such as amino-acid based formulas (AAF) to meet their nutritional needs and in order to resolve the allergic symptoms they suffer from. In Chapter 5, we investigated the modulatory effects of an AAF supplemented with synbiotics on the gut microbiota and showed that both composition and activity approximated that of an age-matched breastfed reference group as opposed to infants receiving the AAF without synbiotics. Similar as observed in Chapter 4 this was driven by an increase of the Bifidobacterium spp./ Lachnospiraceae spp. ratio (B/L-ratio).

    In Chapter 6 we screened the intestinal microbiota of a small set CMA-infants and healthy controls to select donor samples for faecal microbiota transplantation into germ-free mice. We confirmed the decreased B/L-ratio in CMA versus healthy infants as observed in Chapter 5, which was maintained upon transplantation into the germ-free mice. Herein, we showed that CMA-associated infant microbiota resulted in an atopic orientation, with increased immunoglobulin E levels and an enhanced responsiveness to cow’s milk allergen upon sensitization, which suggested that the pathobiology of allergic disease is mediated at least in part by gut microbiome perturbation.

    Gut microbiota from infant with cow’s milk allergy promotes clinical and immune features of atopy in a murine model
    Mauras, Aurélie ; Wopereis, Harm ; Yeop, Intan ; Esber, Nathalie ; Delannoy, Johanne ; Labellie, Chantal ; Reygner, Julie ; Kapel, Nathalie ; Slump, Rob ; Eijndthoven, Tiemen van; Rutten, Lieke ; Knol, Jan ; Garssen, Johan ; Harthoorn, Lucien F. ; Butel, Marie José ; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona ; Hartog, Anita ; Waligora-Dupriet, Anne Judith - \ 2019
    Allergy 74 (2019)9. - ISSN 0105-4538 - p. 1790 - 1793.
    Metaproteomic and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing Analysis of the Infant Fecal Microbiome
    Cortes, Laetitia ; Wopereis, Harm ; Tartiere, Aude ; Piquenot, Julie ; Gouw, Joost W. ; Tims, Sebastian ; Knol, Jan ; Chelsky, Daniel - \ 2019
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences 20 (2019)6. - ISSN 1661-6596
    fecal - infants - intestinal - mass spectrometry - metabolism - metacluster - microbiome

    A metaproteomic analysis was conducted on the fecal microbiome of eight infants to characterize global protein and pathway expression. Although mass spectrometry-based proteomics is now a routine tool, analysis of the microbiome presents specific technical challenges, including the complexity and dynamic range of member taxa, the need for well-annotated metagenomic databases, and high inter-protein sequence redundancy and similarity. In this study, an approach was developed for assessment of biological phenotype and metabolic status, as a functional complement to DNA sequence analysis. Fecal samples were prepared and analysed by tandem mass spectrometry and a homology-based meta-clustering strategy was used to combine peptides from multiple species into representative proteins. In total, 15,250 unique peptides were sequenced and assigned to 2154 metaclusters, which were then assigned to pathways and functional groups. Differences were noted in several pathways, consistent with the dominant genera observed in different subjects. Although this study was not powered to draw conclusions from the comparisons, the results obtained demonstrate the applicability of this approach and provide the methods needed for performing semi-quantitative comparisons of human fecal microbiome composition, physiology and metabolism, as well as a more detailed assessment of microbial composition in comparison to 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    Supplementation of dietary non-digestible oligosaccharides from birth onwards improve social and reduce anxiety-like behaviour in male BALB/c mice
    Szklany, Kirsten ; Wopereis, Harm ; Waard, Cindy de; Wageningen, Thecla van; An, Ran ; Limpt, Kees van; Knol, Jan ; Garssen, Johan ; Knippels, Leon M.J. ; Belzer, Clara ; Kraneveld, Aletta D. - \ 2019
    Nutritional Neuroscience (2019). - ISSN 1028-415X
    Behaviour - dietary supplementation from birth - early life - fructo-oligosaccharide - galacto-oligosaccharide - healthy mice - intestinal microbiota - prebiotics - SCFA - serotonergic system

    Objective: The intestinal microbiota is acknowledged to be essential in brain development and behaviour. Their composition can be modulated by prebiotics such as short-chain galacto-oligosaccharides (scGOS) and long-chain fructo-oligosaccharide (lcFOS). Several studies reported potential health benefit of prebiotics on behaviour. As the prebiotic mixture of scGOS and lcFOS is included in infant formula, we investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with this specific mixture from the day of birth onwards on behaviour and intestinal microbiota development in mice. Method: Healthy male BALB/cByJ mice received, from day of birth, a dietary supplement with or without 3% scGOS:lcFOS (9:1). Behavioural tests were performed pre-weaning, in adolescence, early adulthood and adulthood. We assessed faecal microbiota compositions over time, caecal short-chain fatty acids as well as brain mRNA expression of Htr1a, Htr1b and Tph2 and monoamine levels. Results: Compared to control fed mice, scGOS:lcFOS fed mice showed reduced anxiety-like and repetitive behaviour over time and improved social behaviour in adulthood. The serotonergic system in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and somatosensory cortex (SSC) was affected by the scGOS:lcFOS. In the PFC, mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) was enhanced in scGOS:lcFOS fed mice. Although the bacterial diversity of the intestinal microbiota was unaffected by the scGOS:lcFOS diet, microbiota composition differed between the scGOS:lcFOS and the control fed mice over time. Moreover, an increased saccharolytic and decreased proteolytic fermentation activity were observed in caecum content. Discussion: Supplementing the diet with scGOS:lcFOS from the day of birth is associated with reduced anxiety-like and improved social behaviour during the developmental period and later in life, and modulates the composition and activity of the intestinal microbiota in healthy male BALB/c mice. These data provide further evidence of the potential impact of scGOS:lcFOS on behaviour at several developmental stages throughout life and strengthen the insights in the interplay between the developing intestine and brain.

    A specific synbiotic-containing amino acid-based formula in dietary management of cow's milk allergy : A randomized controlled trial
    Fox, Adam T. ; Wopereis, Harm ; Ampting, Marleen T.J. van; Oude Nijhuis, Manon M. ; Butt, Assad M. ; Peroni, Diego G. ; Vandenplas, Yvan ; Candy, David C.A. ; Shah, Neil ; West, Christina E. ; Garssen, Johan ; Harthoorn, Lucien F. ; Knol, Jan ; Michaelis, Louise J. - \ 2019
    Clinical and Translational Allergy 9 (2019)1. - ISSN 2045-7022
    Bifidobacterium breve M-16V - Cow's milk allergy - Gut microbiota - Prebiotic - Probiotic - Symptoms

    Background: Here we report follow-up data from a double-blind, randomized, controlled multicenter trial, which investigated fecal microbiota changes with a new amino acid-based formula (AAF) including synbiotics in infants with non-immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated cow's milk allergy (CMA). Methods: Subjects were randomized to receive test product (AAF including fructo-oligosaccharides and Bifidobacterium breve M-16V) or control product (AAF) for 8 weeks, after which infants could continue study product until 26 weeks. Fecal percentages of bifidobacteria and Eubacterium rectale/Clostridium coccoides group (ER/CC) were assessed at 0, 8, 12, and 26 weeks. Additional endpoints included stool markers of gut immune status, clinical symptoms, and safety assessments including adverse events and medication use. Results: The trial included 35 test subjects, 36 controls, and 51 in the healthy reference group. Study product was continued by 86% and 92% of test and control subjects between week 8-12, and by 71% and 80%, respectively until week 26. At week 26 median percentages of bifidobacteria were significantly higher in test than control [47.0% vs. 11.8% (p < 0.001)], whereas percentages of ER/CC were significantly lower [(13.7% vs. 23.6% (p = 0.003)]. Safety parameters were similar between groups. Interestingly use of dermatological medication and reported ear infections were lower in test versus control, p = 0.019 and 0.011, respectively. Baseline clinical symptoms and stool markers were mild (but persistent) and low, respectively. Symptoms reduced towards lowest score in both groups. Conclusion: Beneficial effects of this AAF including specific synbiotics on microbiota composition were observed over 26 weeks, and shown suitable for dietary management of infants with non-IgE-mediated CMA.

    A 12-wk whole-grain wheat intervention protects against hepatic fat : the Graandioos study, a randomized trial in overweight subjects
    Schutte, Sophie ; Esser, Diederik ; Hoevenaars, Femke P.M. ; Hooiveld, Guido J.E.J. ; Priebe, Marion G. ; Vonk, Roel J. ; Wopereis, Suzan ; Afman, Lydia A. - \ 2018
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 108 (2018)6. - ISSN 0002-9165 - p. 1264 - 1274.

    Background: Whole-grain wheat (WGW) is described as nutritionally superior to refined wheat (RW) and thus advocated as the healthy choice, although evidence from intervention studies is often inconsistent. The liver, as the central organ in energy metabolism, might be an important target organ for WGW interventions. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefits of WGW consumption compared with RW consumption on liver health and associated parameters. Design: We performed a double-blind, parallel trial in which 50 overweight 45- to 70-y-old men and postmenopausal women were randomly allocated to a 12-wk intervention with either WGW (98 g/d) or RW (98 g/d) products. Before and after the intervention we assessed intrahepatic triglycerides (IHTGs) and fat distribution by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy/magnetic resonance imaging, fecal microbiota composition, adipose tissue gene expression, and several fasting plasma parameters, as well as postprandial plasma lipids after a mixed meal. Results: Fasting plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, nonesterified fatty acids, and insulin were not affected by RW or WGW intervention. We observed a substantial increase of 49.1% in IHTGs in the RW when compared with the WGW group (P = 0.033). Baseline microbiota composition could not predict the increase in IHTGs after RW, but gut microbiota diversity decreased in the RW group when compared with the WGW group (P = 0.010). In the WGW group, we observed increased postprandial triglyceride levels compared with the RW group (P = 0.020). In addition, the WGW intervention resulted in a trend towards lower fasting levels of the liver acute-phase proteins serum amyloid A (P = 0.057) and C-reactive protein (P = 0.064) when compared to the RW intervention. Conclusions: A 12-wk RW intervention increases liver fat and might contribute to the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, whereas a 12-wk 98-g/d WGW intervention prevents a substantial increase in liver fat. Our results show that incorporating feasible doses of WGW in the diet at the expense of RW maintains liver health. The study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02385149.

    A synbiotic-containing amino-acid-based formula improves gut microbiota in non-IgE-mediated allergic infants
    Candy, David C.A. ; Ampting, Marleen T.J. Van; Oude Nijhuis, Manon M. ; Wopereis, Harm ; Butt, Assad M. ; Peroni, Diego G. ; Vandenplas, Yvan ; Fox, Adam T. ; Shah, Neil ; West, Christina E. ; Garssen, Johan ; Harthoorn, Lucien F. ; Knol, Jan ; Michaelis, Louise J. - \ 2018
    Pediatric Research 83 (2018)3. - ISSN 0031-3998 - p. 677 - 686.
    BackgroundPrebiotics and probiotics (synbiotics) can modify gut microbiota and have potential in allergy management when combined with amino-acid-based formula (AAF) for infants with cow's milk allergy (CMA).MethodsThis multicenter, double-blind, randomized controlled trial investigated the effects of an AAF-including synbiotic blend on percentages of bifidobacteria and Eubacterium rectale/Clostridium coccoides group (ER/CC) in feces from infants with suspected non-IgE-mediated CMA. Feces from age-matched healthy breastfed infants were used as reference (healthy breastfed reference (HBR)) for primary outcomes. The CMA subjects were randomized and received test or control formula for 8 weeks. Test formula was a hypoallergenic, nutritionally complete AAF including a prebiotic blend of fructo-oligosaccharides and the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium breve M-16V. Control formula was AAF without synbiotics.ResultsA total of 35 (test) and 36 (control) subjects were randomized; HBR included 51 infants. At week 8, the median percentage of bifidobacteria was higher in the test group than in the control group (35.4% vs. 9.7%, respectively; P<0.001), whereas ER/CC was lower (9.5% vs. 24.2%, respectively; P<0.001). HBR levels of bifidobacteria and ER/CC were 55% and 6.5%, respectively.ConclusionAAF including specific synbiotics, which results in levels of bifidobacteria and ER/CC approximating levels in the HBR group, improves the fecal microbiota of infants with suspected non-IgE-mediated CMA.
    Intestinal microbiota in infants at high risk for allergy : Effects of prebiotics and role in eczema development
    Wopereis, Harm ; Sim, Kathleen ; Shaw, Alexander ; Warner, John O. ; Knol, Jan ; Kroll, J.S. - \ 2018
    Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 141 (2018)4. - ISSN 0091-6749 - p. 1334 - 1342.e5.
    Allergy - Butyrate - Eczema - Gastrointestinal - Infants - Lactate - Microbiome - Microbiota - Prebiotics - Short-chain fatty acids
    Background: Development of the gut microbiota in infancy is important in maturation of the immune system. Deviations in colonization patterns have been associated with allergic manifestations such as eczema, but exact microbiome dysfunctions underlying allergies remain unclear. We studied the gut microbiota of 138 infants at increased risk of allergy, participating in a clinical trial investigating the effectiveness of a partially hydrolyzed protein formula supplemented with nondigestible oligosaccharides on the prevention of eczema. Objective: The effects of interventions and breast-feeding on fecal microbiota were investigated. Additionally, we aimed to identify microbial patterns associated with the onset of eczema. Methods: Bacterial taxonomic compositions in the first 26 weeks of life were analyzed by using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Additionally, fecal pH and microbial metabolite levels were measured. Results: Fecal microbial composition, metabolites, and pH of infants receiving partially hydrolyzed protein formula supplemented with nondigestible oligosaccharides was closer to that of breast-fed infants than that of infants receiving standard cow's milk formula. Infants with eczema by 18 months showed temporal differences that were marked by decreased relative abundances of Parabacteroides and Enterobacteriaceae at 4 weeks and decreased relative abundances of lactate-utilizing bacteria producing butyrate at 26 weeks, namely Eubacterium and Anaerostipes species, supported by increased lactate and decreased butyrate levels. Conclusions: We showed that a partially hydrolyzed protein infant formula with specific prebiotics modulated the gut microbiota closer to that of breast-fed infants. Additionally, we identified a potential link between microbial activity and onset of eczema, which might reflect a suboptimal implementation of gut microbiota at specific developmental stages in infants at high risk for allergy.
    Aberrant intestinal microbiota due to IL-1 receptor antagonist deficiency promotes IL-17- and TLR4-dependent arthritis
    Rogier, Rebecca ; Ederveen, Thomas H.A. ; Boekhorst, Jos ; Wopereis, Harm ; Scher, Jose U. ; Manasson, Julia ; Frambach, Sanne J.C.M. ; Knol, Jan ; Garssen, Johan ; Kraan, Peter M. van der; Koenders, Marije I. ; Berg, Wim B. van den; Hijum, Sacha A.F.T. van; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla - \ 2017
    Microbiome 5 (2017)1. - ISSN 2049-2618 - p. 63 - 63.
    Autoimmune arthritis - IL-1 receptor antagonist - Microbiota - T helper 17 cells - Toll-like receptors
    BACKGROUND: Perturbation of commensal intestinal microbiota has been associated with several autoimmune diseases. Mice deficient in interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (Il1rn -/- mice) spontaneously develop autoimmune arthritis and are susceptible to other autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, diabetes, and encephalomyelitis; however, the mechanisms of increased susceptibility to these autoimmune phenotypes are poorly understood. We investigated the role of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in regulation of commensal intestinal microbiota, and assessed the involvement of microbiota subsets and innate and adaptive mucosal immune responses that underlie the development of spontaneous arthritis in Il1rn -/- mice.RESULTS: Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we show that IL-1Ra critically maintains the diversity and regulates the composition of intestinal microbiota in mice. IL-1Ra deficiency reduced the intestinal microbial diversity and richness, and caused specific taxonomic alterations characterized by overrepresented Helicobacter and underrepresented Ruminococcus and Prevotella. Notably, the aberrant intestinal microbiota in IL1rn -/- mice specifically potentiated IL-17 production by intestinal lamina propria (LP) lymphocytes and skewed the LP T cell balance in favor of T helper 17 (Th17) cells, an effect transferable to WT mice by fecal microbiota. Importantly, LP Th17 cell expansion and the development of spontaneous autoimmune arthritis in IL1rn -/- mice were attenuated under germ-free condition. Selective antibiotic treatment revealed that tobramycin-induced alterations of commensal intestinal microbiota, i.e., reduced Helicobacter, Flexispira, Clostridium, and Dehalobacterium, suppressed arthritis in IL1rn -/- mice. The arthritis phenotype in IL1rn -/- mice was previously shown to depend on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Using the ablation of both IL-1Ra and TLR4, we here show that the aberrations in the IL1rn -/- microbiota are partly TLR4-dependent. We further identify a role for TLR4 activation in the intestinal lamina propria production of IL-17 and cytokines involved in Th17 differentiation preceding the onset of arthritis.CONCLUSIONS: These findings identify a critical role for IL1Ra in maintaining the natural diversity and composition of intestinal microbiota, and suggest a role for TLR4 in mucosal Th17 cell induction associated with the development of autoimmune disease in mice.
    Synbiotics-supplemented amino acid-based formula supports adequate growth in cow's milk allergic infants
    Burks, A.W. ; Harthoorn, L.F. ; Ampting, M.T.J. Van; Oude Nijhuis, M.M. ; Langford, J.E. ; Wopereis, Harm ; Goldberg, S.B. ; Ong, P.Y. ; Essink, B.J. ; Scott, R.B. ; Harvey, B.M. - \ 2015
    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 26 (2015)4. - ISSN 0905-6157 - p. 316 - 322.
    Amino acid-based formula - Cow's milk allergy - Growth - Infant - Prebiotics - Probiotics - Randomized double-blind controlled trial - Safety

    Background: Children with cow's milk allergy (CMA) are at risk for inadequate nutritional intake and growth. Dietary management of CMA, therefore, requires diets that are not only hypoallergenic but also support adequate growth in this population. This study assessed growth of CMA infants when using a new amino acid-based formula (AAF) with prebiotics and probiotics (synbiotics) and evaluated its safety in the intended population. Methods: In a prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled study, full-term infants with diagnosed CMA received either an AAF (control; n = 56) or AAF with synbiotics (oligofructose, long-chain inulin, acidic oligosaccharides, Bifidobacterium breve M-16V) (test; n = 54) for 16 wk. Primary outcome was growth, measured as weight, length and head circumference. Secondary outcomes included allergic symptoms and stool characteristics. Results: Average age (±SD) of infants at inclusion was 4.5 ± 2.4 months. Both formulas equally supported growth according to WHO 2006 growth charts and resulted in similar increases of weight, length and head circumference. At week 16, differences (90% CI) in Z-scores (test-control) were as follows: weight 0.147 (-0.10; 0.39, p = 0.32), length -0.299 (-0.69; 0.09, p = 0.21) and head circumference 0.152 (-0.15; 0.45, p = 0.40). Weight-for-age and length-for-age Z-scores were not significantly different between the test and control groups. Both formulas were well tolerated and reduced allergic symptoms; the number of adverse events was not different between the groups. Conclusions: This is the first study that shows that an AAF with a specific synbiotic blend, suitable for CMA infants, supports normal growth and growth similar to the AAF without synbiotics. This clinical trial is registered as NCT00664768.

    Assessment of rice self-sufficiency in 2025 in eight African countries
    Oort, P.A.J. van; Saito, K. ; Tanaka, A. ; Amovin-Assagaba, E. ; Bussel, L.G.J. van; Wart, J. van; Groot, H.L.E. de; Ittersum, M.K. van; Cassman, K.G. ; Wopereis, M.C.S. - \ 2015
    Global Food Security 5 (2015). - ISSN 2211-9124 - p. 39 - 49.
    Most African countries are far from self-sufficient in meeting their rice consumption; in eight countries the production: consumption ratio, ranged from 0.16 to 1.18 in 2012. We show that for the year 2025, with population growth, diet change and yield increase on existing land (intensification), countries cannot become fully self-sufficient in rice. This implies that for the future, a mixture of area expansion and imports will be needed on top of yield gap closure. Further research is needed for identification of most suitable new land for rice area expansion and areas that should be protected.
    Analyzing metabolomics-based challenge tests
    Vis, D.J. ; Westerhuis, J.A. ; Jacobs, D.M. ; Duynhoven, J.P.M. van; Wopereis, S. ; Ommen, B. van; Hendriks, M.M.W.B. ; Smilde, A.K. - \ 2015
    Metabolomics 11 (2015)1. - ISSN 1573-3882 - p. 50 - 63.
    glucose-tolerance test - insulin sensitivity - mathematical-models - component analysis - plasma metabolome - health - asca - reconstruction - phenotype - discovery
    Challenge tests are used to assess the resilience of human beings to perturbations by analyzing responses to detect functional abnormalities. Well known examples are allergy tests and glucose tolerance tests. Increasingly, metabolomics analysis of blood or serum samples is used to analyze the biological response of the individual to these challenges. The information content of such metabolomics challenge test data involves both the disturbance and restoration of homeostasis on a metabolic level and is thus inherently different from the analysis of steady state data. It opens doors to study the variation of resilience between individuals beyond the classical biomarkers; preferably in terms of underlying biological processes. We review challenge tests in which metabolomics was used to analyze the biological response. Specifically, we describe strategies to perform statistical analyses on the responses and we will show some examples of these strategies applied to a postprandial challenge that was used to study a diet with anti-inflammatory properties. Finally we discuss open issues and give recommendation for further research.
    Aberrant intestinal microbiota due to IL-1 receptor antagonist deficiency promotes IL-17- and TLR4-dependent arthritis
    Rogier, Rebecca ; Ederveen, Thomas H.A. ; Boekhorst, Jos ; Wopereis, H.J. ; Scher, Jose U. ; Manasson, Julia ; Knol, J. ; Garssen, Johan ; Kraan, Peter M. van der; Koenders, Marije I. ; Berg, Wim B. van den; Hijum, Sacha A.F.T. van; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla - \ 2014
    Radboud University
    PRJEB7447 - ERP007176
    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of IL-1 receptor signalling and the involvement of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 in defining the intestinal microbiota and the associated mucosal and systemic immune response. Multiplex 454 pyrosequencing of V5 and V6 hyper-variable regions of fecal bacterial 16S rRNA was used to define intestinal microbial communities in BALB/c wild type (WT), IL-1Ra-/- and IL-1Ra/TLR double knock-out (DKO) mice.
    The first thousand days – intestinal microbiology of early life: establishing a symbiosis
    Wopereis, H. ; Oozeer, R. ; Knipping, K. ; Belzer, C. ; Knol, J. - \ 2014
    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 25 (2014)5. - ISSN 0905-6157 - p. 428 - 438.
    gradient gel-electrophoresis - infant gut microbiota - fecal microbiota - atopic-dermatitis - allergic diseases - immune-system - galacto-oligosaccharides - fructo-oligosaccharides - reduced diversity - human-milk
    The development of the intestinal microbiota in the first years of life is a dynamic process significantly influenced by early-life nutrition. Pioneer bacteria colonizing the infant intestinal tract and the gradual diversification to a stable climax ecosystem plays a crucial role in establishing host–microbe interactions essential for optimal symbiosis. This colonization process and establishment of symbiosis may profoundly influence health throughout life. Recent developments in microbiologic cultivation-independent methods allow a detailed view of the key players and factors involved in this process and may further elucidate their roles in a healthy gut and immune maturation. Aberrant patterns may lead to identifying key microbial signatures involved in developing immunologic diseases into adulthood, such as asthma and atopic diseases. The central role of early-life nutrition in the developmental human microbiota, immunity, and metabolism offers promising strategies for prevention and treatment of such diseases. This review provides an overview of the development of the intestinal microbiota, its bidirectional relationship with the immune system, and its role in impacting health and disease, with emphasis on allergy, in early life.
    Altered gut microbiota and activity in a murine model of autism spectrum disorders
    Theije, C.G. de; Wopereis, H.J. ; Ramadan, M. ; Eijndthoven, T. van; Lambert, J. ; Knol, J. ; Garssen, J. ; Kraneveld, A.D. ; Oozeer, R. - \ 2014
    Brain, Behavior, and Immunity 37 (2014). - ISSN 0889-1591 - p. 197 - 206.
    valproic acid - intestinal microbiota - maternal separation - host interactions - propionic-acid - onset autism - children - brain - microflora - exposure
    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous group of complex neurodevelopmental disorders with evidence of genetic predisposition. Intestinal disturbances are reported in ASD patients and compositional changes in gut microbiota are described. However, the role of microbiota in brain disorders is poorly documented. Here, we used a murine model of ASD to investigate the relation between gut microbiota and autism-like behaviour. Using next generation sequencing technology, microbiota composition was investigated in mice in utero exposed to valproic acid (VPA). Moreover, levels of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and lactic acid in caecal content were determined. Our data demonstrate a transgenerational impact of in utero VPA exposure on gut microbiota in the offspring. Prenatal VPA exposure affected operational taxonomic units (OTUs) assigned to genera within the main phyla of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes and the order of Desulfovibrionales, corroborating human ASD studies. In addition, OTUs assigned to genera of Alistipes, Enterorhabdus, Mollicutes and Erysipelotrichalis were especially associated with male VPA-exposed offspring. The microbial differences of VPA in utero-exposed males deviated from those observed in females and was (i) positively associated with increased levels of caecal butyrate as well as ileal neutrophil infiltration and (ii) inversely associated with intestinal levels of serotonin and social behaviour scores. These findings show that autism-like behaviour and its intestinal phenotype is associated with altered microbial colonization and activity in a murine model for ASD, with preponderance in male offspring. These results open new avenues in the scientific trajectory of managing neurodevelopmental disorders by gut microbiome modulation
    Check title to add to marked list
    << previous | next >>

    Show 20 50 100 records per page

     
    Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.