Volume 7 Environmental Costs and Benefits of Transgenic Crops

cover_198.jpg Wesseler, J.H.H. (Ed.)
2005, IX, 268 p., Softcover
ISBN: 978-1-4020-3248-6

About this book

Concern about the environmental impacts of transgenic crops is one of the major reasons for the EU’s quasi-moratorium on GMOs. The contributions in this book show that the economic implications of these concerns are far-reaching and complex. They range from the farm level to research and technology development on the one side and consumer reactions on the other side, and influence not only government response but also international trade and public and private incentives for R&D.


Each contribution includes a comment, which raises questions that need further investigation. A summary of the questions in research topics concludes the contributions. The book will be of interests for policy makers as well as scholars working in established areas of social and natural sciences with an interest in the complex issues related to the release of transgenic crops.

Written for:

Policy makers and scholars working in established areas of social and natural sciences with an interest in the complex issues related to the release of transgenic crops

Table of Contents

Preface

Preface
N.A. Editors
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Chapters

Environmental benefits and costs of transgenic crops: introduction
J. Wesseler
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1-6
D.E. Ervin, R. Welsh
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7-29
Comment on Ervin and Welsh: Environmental effects of genetically modified crops: differentiated risk assessment and management
W.J. Stiekema
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31
G.A. Kleter, H.A. Kuiper
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33-43
Comment on Kleter and Kuiper: Environmental fate and impact considerations related to the use of transgenic crops
T.M. Hurley
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45-46
R. Laxminarayan, D. Simpson
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47-60
Comment on Laxminarayan and Simpson: Biological limits on agricultural intensification: an example from resistance management
C. Soregarol
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61-62
J. Schubert, J. Matoušek, P. Supp
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63-78
Comment on Schubert, Matoušek and Supp: Stability of pathogen-derived Potato virus Y resistance in potato under field conditions and some aspects of their ecological impact
R. Laxminarayan
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79
T.M. Hurley
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81-93
Comment on Hurley: Bacillus thuringiensis resistance management: experiences from the USA
R. Welsh
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95
C. Van de Wiel, M. Groot, H. Den Nijs
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97-110
Comment on Van de Wiel, Groot and Den Nijs: Gene flow from crop to wild plants and its population-ecological consequences in the context of GM-crop biosafety, including some recent experiences from lettuce
S. Scatasta
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111-112
M. Demont, J. Wesseler, E. Tollens
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113-122
Comment on Demont, Wesseler and Tollens: Irreversible costs and benefits of transgenic crops: what are they?
M. Hanson
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123-124
R. Weaver
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125-140
Comment on Weaver: Ex post evidence on adoption of transgenic crops: US soybeans
W.J.M. Heijman
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141-142
C.A. Gilligan, D. Claessen, F. Van den Bosch
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143-161
Comment on Gilligan, Claessen and Van den Bosch: Spatial and temporal dynamics of gene movements arising from deployment of transgenic crops
E. Van Ierland
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163-164
C. Soregaroli, J. Wesseler
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165-181
Comment on Soregaroli and Wesseler: Minimum distance requirements and liability: implications for co-existence
V. Beckmann
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183-184
H. Van den Belt
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185-197
Comment on Van den Belt: Biotechnology, the US-EU dispute and the Precautionary Principle
W.A. Kerr
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199-201
T. Goeschl
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203-217
Comment on Goeschl: Do patent-style intellectual property rights on transgenic crops harm the environment?
H. Hogeveen, T. Michalopoulos
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219-223
G. Graff, D. Roland-Holst, D. Zilberman
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225-245
Comment on Graff, Roland-Holst and Zilberman: Agricultural biotechnology and globalization: how will public-private partnership evolve?
P.J.G.M. De Wit
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247-248
J.E. Hobbs, W.A. Kerr
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249-262
Comment on Hobbs and Kerr: Will consumers lose or gain from the environmental impacts of transgenic crops?
S. Scatasta
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263-264
Conclusions
J. Wesseler
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265-266

Lists

List of authors
N.A. Editors
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